http://rogersgardengate.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 01:28:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 The color of spring is white https://rogersgardengate.com/the-color-of-spring-is-white/ https://rogersgardengate.com/the-color-of-spring-is-white/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 15:15:07 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/the-color-of-spring-is-white/

Chris Dalzell

No matter where you are, spring is usually a colorful time.

Many deciduous trees bloom in the spring before the leaves appear. A notable color in and around Durban in the springtime is white. I’ve made a project of this to name a few of my favorite white plants that bloom in September, which you can use in your gardens, regardless of their size. It’s never too late to add new plants.

I get questions all the time from the public who have read these articles, asking me how they can improve their gardens and what plants will bring birds, bees and insects to their gardens. Often times you will have a garden with the most interesting plants, but they were planted incorrectly or in the wrong place. All you need to know are plant preferences and move them around so that they maximize your space.

Xylotheca kraussiana (African rosehip) has sweet-scented white flowers that appear in late August and September and is the food plant of the blood-red Acraea butterfly.

Trees

Dombeya rotundifolia (wild pear). Flower best in the cooler, drier parts of KwaZulu-Natal, but in the Upper Highway area of ​​Kloof and Hillcrest, they flower very well. I have five large trees in my garden that have been blooming for five weeks and still have a few more weeks of blooming. The flowers are white and fragrant and are found at the end of the branches. It grows quickly to around 5m and makes a pretty garden specimen.

Xylotheca kraussiana (African-dogrose). Small semi-deciduous tree. Form a pretty focal point in your garden with lightly fragrant white flowers that appear in late August and September. The tree can reach 10m under ideal conditions, but normally grows to around 3-5m in private gardens. The fruits are yellow, woody and, when opening, exhibit black seeds with a red aril. It is the mother plant of the blood red Acraea butterfly. Very rewarding tree for a small garden.

Gardenia thunbergia (forest gardenia). Flowering shrub or small tree with showy white flowers and very fragrant, especially at night. A shrub or small evergreen tree, the gently scented flowers open at night and bloom only one day, but continue to produce flowers for several weeks, but particularly from late spring through summer. Ideal for a small garden. To be planted preferably in partial shade. The fruits remain on the plant for many years until they eventually drop to the ground.

Rothmannia globosa (September bells) produces white bell-shaped flowers with a sweet scent in September.

Rothmannia globosa (September bells). Small evergreen tree that grows to around 7m, producing softly fragrant white bell-shaped flowers in September. Mostly evergreen, it is an ideal tree for a small or large garden with plenty of shade.

Tabernaemontana ventricosa (forest toad tree). Small to medium-sized evergreen tree that produces lightly fragrant white flowers throughout the year. Very rewarding for any size garden and attracts lots of wildlife, birds and insects. Produces a large, smooth and persistent pod that splits in half, revealing an orange pulp with encrusted seeds. Can grow in dark, shady gardens.

Mackaya bella (forest tramp) is perfect for shade gardens, is pollinated by honey and carpenter bees, and is the food plant of the blue pansy butterfly.

Shrubs

Mackaya bella (forest tramp) A large shrub or small tree that bears shiny dark green leaves and beautiful clusters of showy, white to purple, bell-shaped flowers in spring and early summer. Perfect if you have a very shady garden. The flowers are pollinated by honey and carpenter bees, and it is the food plant of the blue pansy butterfly.

Carissa bispinosa (num-num) is an evergreen shrub with beautiful, glossy foliage and produces fragrant, star-white, jasmine-like flowers in spring.

Carissa bispinosa (num-num). This evergreen shrub produces beautiful, glossy foliage with fragrant star-white flowers reminiscent of jasmine in spring. Carissas, if growing, make attractive ornamental shrubs and can be trained and trimmed to make excellent hedges or along walls to cover ugly spaces. Grows well in sun and shade. Easily grown from seed.

Turraea obtusifolia (small honeysuckle). Produces masses of showy white flowers in summer and decorative orange-red berries in late summer through winter. The flowers are large, showy, pure white and produced abundantly in small clusters among the leaves in mid to late summer (January and February). I have had one in my garden for 14 years that is covered in flowers and seems to bloom all year round. In shady areas it becomes a scrambler, so it is best to grow this shrub in full sun to maximize its beauty.

Dietes grandiflora (wild iris) is a common ground cover due to its versatility.

Ground covers and bulbs

Dietes grandiflora (wild iris). It’s a very common ground cover in most gardens, but it’s great for holding embankments, covering ugly walls, and creating height in your garden. It is the best filler plant for open areas, especially in the shade. Plants grow from an underground, perennial, evergreen rhizome, and can form large clumps. The flowers are mass produced, normally before or after a summer rain, and are white with yellow nectar guides inside the flowers. Easily grown from divisions or seeds, this is probably the simplest and most attractive of all known ground covers for your garden.

Crinum macowanii (nenuphar). Summer-growing deciduous bulb, with large fleshy leaves 1 m long, strip-shaped with underlying margins. The large, bell-shaped, lightly scented white lilies with dark pink stripes are produced on umbels of five to 25 flowers at the end of a long stalk from September to December. It grows quickly, requires full sun, and needs lots of water during the summer. In winter, when the plant is dormant, it does not need a lot of water and does not like to be disturbed, especially the delicate roots. If the roots are damaged, it will affect its flowering. Watch for the amaryllis caterpillar that feeds on the leaves. If you have a wet part in your garden, plant the bulb there as it will grow and thrive under these conditions.

Anthericum saundersiae (Anthericum weeping). Perfect herbaceous plant that covers quickly and produces numerous small white star shaped flowers that attract bumblebees. It is a good filler in flower beds. It grows up to 400mm tall, spreads very quickly and can be cut once a year to allow new growth in the spring. Requires full sun and plenty of water.

Chlorophytum bowkeri (giant chlorophytum). Perennial, evergreen and perennial ground cover that grows up to 1m tall mainly in shady areas and needs water. Can be split and split once a year to produce many more plants. It forms large, dense clumps of numerous light green, striped leaves. The flowers are clustered on long spikes atop slender stems, with more than one flower per bract. The pure white star shaped flowers are very showy and will close at night. It flowers in summer (November to February).

Asystasia gangetica (creeping foxglove) is a fast-growing ground cover, flowers non-stop and easily grows from cuttings. Perfect for banks that need to be covered quickly. They grow best in the shade but can get some sun.

Asystasia gangetica (creeping foxglove). Fast growing ground cover, blooms nonstop and grows easily from cuttings. Not for small gardens as it is very vigorous and will cover most of your garden in a matter of months. It produces a cream-colored flower with purple mosaic markings on the palate (lower petal of the corolla) in spring and summer. Perfect for banks that need to be covered quickly. They grow best in the shade but can get some sun.

Things to do this month

We have such a choice of plants in South Africa so when planning make the most of what’s available and try to be locally native.

Do ornamental lawns use the most water of any crop in the world? As water becomes more and more scarce every year, we must be aware of using as little water as possible. The only lawn I have is on my edge and I leave that to the elements of nature. The only water it receives is rainwater and I make sure that in winter I never mow my lawns or add water or fertilizer until it rains, which does is not often in winter. When I mow my lawn (once a week in the summer), I mow it as high as possible to allow healthy root growth and more leaves to absorb photosynthesis.

Take all the leaves that have fallen from your trees in the winter and lay them out in your flower beds. Mulching prevents water loss, adds nutrients to the soil, and prevents weed growth. It’s a simple process which is Mother Nature’s best way to add and improve the quality of your soil.

Prune shrubs and trees that are overgrown or have finished flowering for this season. Pruning stimulates growth and now is the time to prune them to allow these plants to produce a new growth spurt for the summer. Check your shrubs for insects, especially mealybugs that attack old, unhealthy parts of the plant. Remove the infected parts and let the dormant buds initiate a new growth spurt for the summer. Always watch your plants for insects. If you must spray, use a natural product that does not harm the environment or kill beneficial insects.

Go for a walk. It’s good for the soul.

Good gardening

  • This article is sponsored by Chris Dalzell Landscapes, who specializes in landscaping, consulting, plant brokerage, and botanical tours. Email your questions to [email protected]

The independent on Saturday


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Tropical gardening: mood-enhancing drugs, nothing new https://rogersgardengate.com/tropical-gardening-mood-enhancing-drugs-nothing-new/ https://rogersgardengate.com/tropical-gardening-mood-enhancing-drugs-nothing-new/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 10:05:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/tropical-gardening-mood-enhancing-drugs-nothing-new/

Coca, opium, marijuana, and hundreds of other plants used to alter our perception of reality are not new to previous cultures and civilizations. We often think of mood-altering drugs with concern, but they have been part of the human condition for thousands of years. Marijuana, opium poppy and coca leaf have been used as well as some mushrooms and even sap from the trumpet tree. As with the angel’s trumpet, it can also be very poisonous, so only South and Central American shamans can be allowed to use it. Many substances derived from these plants are now illegal in some countries due to the possibility of dangerous abuse. In the case of the sap of the angel’s trumpet, it can easily kill you if ingested. Others are so much a part of our culture that we don’t pay much attention to them. These include coffee, tea and chocolate.

For example, chocolate is associated with improving romance and elevating our mood. The history of chocolate began with the Aztecs around 400 BC. They believed that cocoa beans were the gift of Quetzalcoatl, the god of wisdom. It was believed to be an aphrodisiac and to give strength. Originally, it was prepared as a drink mixed with spices or mashed corn. After arriving in Europe in the 1500s, sugar was added to it and it became popular with both rich and poor.

Many years ago cocoa and tea were considered cash crops in Hawaii, along with coffee. They grew well and produced very good quality, but could not compete in the world market. High labor costs and inadequate marketing were probably the limiting factors. Even marijuana has been cultivated legally in the past and is now legalized with some restrictions. When we look at potentially profitable crops, there are some to consider that most people would approve of. Hawaiian kava and mamake come to mind because they are uniquely associated with Hawaiian culture.

However, as we look at exciting new ways to garden and grow, sometimes we find that a fresh take on old cultures gives us a new perspective. Cocoa is a product that looks very promising now due to the interest of local farmers, retailers and foodies. They have organized themselves to form several chocolate groups across the state to promote the cultivation, production and marketing of Hawaiian chocolate. Some delicious sweets are now available in the local market and are ideal gourmet gifts to share with friends, family and visitors to Hawaii.

Cocoa, or Theobroma cocoa as is known scientifically, is ornamental as well as useful. Which Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day is complete without chocolate?

Cocoa and tea grow well on the Big Island. Although cocoa is believed to have originated in the Amazon region just north of the equator, it may have been cultivated in Mexico for thousands of years. In Indonesia, Malaysia and tropical Africa there are thousands of hectares in production where the climate is hot, humid and humid like eastern Hawaii. It’s also found in many gardens that grow well in Kona and eastern Hawaii, but cocoa plants don’t like dry winds or beaches.

Tea plants can also be found in the gardens of the Big Island. Most people think of tea as a cultivated crop limited to equatorial countries. This is however a misconception. The tea grows in a wide range of climates and can be cultivated in areas ranging from equatorial to temperate zones. Tea belongs to the camellia family. Its correct botanical name is Camellia sinensis, and is closely related to the horticultural varieties of camellia which bloom beautifully in many home gardens and public parks.

The tea plant is an attractive evergreen shrub native to Assam. There are about a thousand known varieties that differ in flower and shade of green leaves as well as in flavor when brewed.

Locating plants is not easy, but once planted and established, maintenance is no problem. Some nurseries occasionally sell tea and cocoa plants. These crops are usually grown where labor costs are low. In Hawaii, tea and cocoa are worth considering for a more interesting garden as well as craft crops like Kona coffee.

For more information, contact the UHCTAHR Master Gardeners Helpline at 322-4893 in Kona or 981-5199 in Hilo.


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Gardening with Jo: Beautiful and practical trees for the privacy of your garden https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-with-jo-beautiful-and-practical-trees-for-the-privacy-of-your-garden-2/ https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-with-jo-beautiful-and-practical-trees-for-the-privacy-of-your-garden-2/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:23:04 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-with-jo-beautiful-and-practical-trees-for-the-privacy-of-your-garden-2/

Lately we’ve all found solace in our backyards and I’m happy to say that doesn’t seem to be diminishing since we’ve found more freedom from lockdown.

People are always looking for mature trees and trees for screening and privacy on our Caragh Nurseries website, so let me share with you some of our personal favorites and explain how they can be both beautiful and practical.

Quercus Ilex or Holm Oak

Evergreen Oak is always at the top of our list because it ticks all the boxes. It is persistent, provides good coverage, but is also easy to care for and its growth is relatively slow.

This evergreen tree is most often grown as a standard tree on a clear 1.8 meter trunk, with a compact but full head. Sometimes it’s sculpted and cylindrical, but can also be grown loose and more natural, while still providing a great display.

It is a member of the oak family but its botanical name, Quercus Ilex, refers to the fact that its leaves are more like holly or ilex in shape and structure.

This tree can grow taller over time, but its slow growth ensures that it can be easily managed with pruning every three to five years.

Olea Europea or Olivier

We all have a long-standing love affair with the olive tree here on the nursery. The gray-green foliage and loose tendrils remind us of some of our favorite places in the world. They are unlike any other evergreen tree, they are sweeter, softer but just as hardy; and there is no other tree that you can mature in terms of years. We have trees on the nursery that are over 50 years old and we have supplied and delivered trees to a hotel that was over 1,500 years old. It is not only a work of art, but also a slice of history.

Pinus Sylvestris or Scots pine

We have been growing Scots pine in our fields in Caragh for almost 20 years. With its bluish gray needles and marvelous flamboyant sculptural form (when ripe) and orange bark, this is such an instantly recognizable tree.

As with virtually all conifers, it begins its life as a fairly unremarkable cone-shaped tree, but as it matures it loses its lower branches and can form the most beautiful and creative shapes. . The normal tree can take 40 years (at least) to reach 35 feet, when it takes on some of its finest traits. It’s not only great for scouting and wonderful when ripe, it’s also one of the best trees for absorbing noise pollution.

Magnolia grandiflora or Evergreen Magnolia

The evergreen magnolia is very different in appearance from the usual deciduous magnolias with its large oversized glossy leaves with their fluffy rust colored underside.

It grows in a true conical natural habit and grows considerably taller, but the most impressive detail that sets it apart are the flowers that arrive much later in the year, blooming around July in Ireland.

Flowers are few, bloom much better in Dublin and on the south coast but there are still a very small number of flowers on average a year – but what flowers! A tumbler huge like creamy white flowers, such an awesome sight and scent.

These are beautiful trees planted as a centerpiece but also planted in rows of three or five.

Arbutus unedo or Killarney Strawberry Tree

This tree is commonly referred to as the Killarney strawberry tree because it is native to southwestern Ireland, but it is believed to have been imported from northern Spain and Portugal.

It is recognized as a lovely domed evergreen foliage in gardens, especially near the coast where it does well in salt-laden breezes.

Like all strawberry trees, it needs good drainage. It is one of those trees that grows very slowly but is worth the wait. Its strawberry-like fruits can be eaten but do not taste as pleasant as they seem; and its white bell-shaped flowers cover the tree in early summer. It is naturally a multi-stemmed tree and will grow to be around 20 feet tall, but it could take over 50 years.

Fagus sylvatica or beech

Beech is often considered the mother of the forest because it casts a protective shadow with its leaves. It is also called the queen of the forest, the companion of the king of the forest: the oak.

In legends, beech is associated with ancient wisdom. And historically thin slices of beech formed the first book. These days the beech is just a pretty gorgeous tree and one that we recommend both for maturity and for scouting. Although it is deciduous, it retains its coppery foliage of fallen leaves, creating cover to help screen even in winter. It is therefore a win-win solution for those who wish to create a barrier while retaining the beauty of the changing seasonality of one of our native trees. The added benefit of deciduous trees like beech being less expensive than their evergreen counterparts also helps.

All of these trees can be planted year round and can be provided in mature and larger sizes to create instant impact in any size garden, and also help with modern issues associated with nearby life and lack. privacy that brings with that. We love the perks of city living, but not necessarily having the next bedroom window facing directly out to your kitchen window. A cleverly placed tree can usually be the answer.


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Gardening with Jo: Beautiful and practical trees for the privacy of your garden https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-with-jo-beautiful-and-practical-trees-for-the-privacy-of-your-garden/ https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-with-jo-beautiful-and-practical-trees-for-the-privacy-of-your-garden/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 14:18:13 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-with-jo-beautiful-and-practical-trees-for-the-privacy-of-your-garden/

Lately we’ve all found solace in our backyards and I’m happy to say that doesn’t seem to be diminishing since we’ve found more freedom from lockdown.

People are always looking for mature trees and trees for screening and privacy on our Caragh Nurseries website, so let me share with you some of our personal favorites and explain how they can be both beautiful and practical.

Quercus Ilex or Holm Oak

Evergreen Oak is always at the top of our list because it ticks all the boxes. It is persistent, provides good coverage, but is also easy to care for and its growth is relatively slow.

This evergreen tree is most often grown as a standard tree on a clear 1.8 meter trunk, with a compact but full head. Sometimes it’s sculpted and cylindrical, but can also be grown loose and more natural, while still providing a great display.

It is a member of the oak family but its botanical name, Quercus Ilex, refers to the fact that its leaves are more like holly or ilex in shape and structure.

This tree can grow taller over time, but its slow growth ensures that it can be easily managed with pruning every three to five years.

Olea Europea or Olivier

We all have a long-standing love affair with the olive tree here on the nursery. The gray-green foliage and loose tendrils remind us of some of our favorite places in the world. They are unlike any other evergreen tree, they are sweeter, softer but just as hardy; and there is no other tree that you can mature in terms of years. We have trees on the nursery that are over 50 years old and we have supplied and delivered trees to a hotel that was over 1,500 years old. It is not only a work of art, but also a slice of history.

Pinus Sylvestris or Scots pine

We have been growing Scots pine in our fields in Caragh for almost 20 years. With its bluish gray needles and marvelous flamboyant sculptural form (when ripe) and orange bark, this is such an instantly recognizable tree.

As with virtually all conifers, it begins its life as a fairly unremarkable cone-shaped tree, but as it matures it loses its lower branches and can form the most beautiful and creative shapes. . The normal tree can take 40 years (at least) to reach 35 feet, when it takes on some of its finest traits. It’s not only great for scouting and wonderful when ripe, it’s also one of the best trees for absorbing noise pollution.

Magnolia grandiflora or Evergreen Magnolia

The evergreen magnolia is very different in appearance from the usual deciduous magnolias with its large oversized glossy leaves with their fluffy rust colored underside.

It grows in a true conical natural habit and grows considerably taller, but the most impressive detail that sets it apart are the flowers that arrive much later in the year, blooming around July in Ireland.

Flowers are few, bloom much better in Dublin and on the south coast but there are still a very small number of flowers on average a year – but what flowers! A tumbler huge like creamy white flowers, such an awesome sight and scent.

These are beautiful trees planted as a centerpiece but also planted in rows of three or five.

Arbutus unedo or Killarney Strawberry Tree

This tree is commonly referred to as the Killarney strawberry tree because it is native to southwestern Ireland, but it is believed to have been imported from northern Spain and Portugal.

It is recognized as a lovely domed evergreen foliage in gardens, especially near the coast where it does well in salt-laden breezes.

Like all strawberry trees, it needs good drainage. It is one of those trees that grows very slowly but is worth the wait. Its strawberry-like fruits can be eaten but do not taste as pleasant as they seem; and its white bell-shaped flowers cover the tree in early summer. It is naturally a multi-stemmed tree and will grow to be around 20 feet tall, but it could take over 50 years.

Fagus sylvatica or beech

Beech is often considered the mother of the forest because it casts a protective shadow with its leaves. It is also called the queen of the forest, the companion of the king of the forest: the oak.

In legends, beech is associated with ancient wisdom. And historically thin slices of beech formed the first book. These days the beech is just a pretty gorgeous tree and one that we recommend both for maturity and for scouting. Although it is deciduous, it retains its coppery foliage of fallen leaves, creating cover to help screen even in winter. It is therefore a win-win solution for those who wish to create a barrier while retaining the beauty of the changing seasonality of one of our native trees. The added benefit of deciduous trees like beech being less expensive than their evergreen counterparts also helps.

All of these trees can be planted year round and can be provided in mature and larger sizes to create instant impact in any size garden, and also help with modern issues associated with nearby life and lack. privacy that brings with that. We love the perks of city living, but not necessarily having the next bedroom window facing directly out to your kitchen window. A cleverly placed tree can usually be the answer.


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Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala organizes a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting-2/ https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting-2/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:02:05 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting-2/

PATIALA: Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala in association with IFFCO, Patiala today organized a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting. This campaign was organized to mark the International Year of Millet. In this event, more than 100 farmers participated.

Dr Vipan Kumar Rampal, Deputy Director (Trg.), KVK, Patiala, welcomed guests and delivered keynote address on the role of plantations in sustainable agriculture and rural livelihoods. Ch. Bahadur Singh, State Director, IFFCO spoke about IFFCO’s activities for the welfare of farmers. He stressed the importance of organizing such events to sensitize the rural masses to millets. Dr Rachna Singla, Assistant Professor (Horticulture), spoke about nutritional gardening and mushroom cultivation for family nutrition security. Dr. Rajni Goel, Associate Professor (Food Sciences) spoke about the scope of food processing. Dr. Gurupdesh Kaur, Associate Professor (Home Sciences) gave a lecture on nutri-cereals and their role in human health. Participants attended the online nutri-mega enclave hosted by ICAR-IIMR-Hyderabad. Dr Hardeep Singh Sabhikhi, Assistant Professor (Plant Pathology) gave a lecture on the perspectives of beekeeping. The webcast of the ICAR New Delhi program was well attended by the attendees. Vegetable seed kits and fruit plants were distributed to farmers during this campaign. A millets quiz contest was also held at this event and quiz winners Kulwinder Kaur (vill. Inderpura), Gurdeep Kaur (vill. Panaudia), Navpreet Kaur (Nabha), Sandeep Kaur (vill. Mangewal) & Charanjit Kaur (vill. Kallarmajri) received trophies.


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Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala organizes a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting/ https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:02:05 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting/

PATIALA: Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala in association with IFFCO, Patiala today organized a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting. This campaign was organized to mark the International Year of Millet. In this event, more than 100 farmers participated.

Dr Vipan Kumar Rampal, Deputy Director (Trg.), KVK, Patiala, welcomed guests and delivered keynote address on the role of plantations in sustainable agriculture and rural livelihoods. Ch. Bahadur Singh, State Director, IFFCO spoke about IFFCO’s activities for the welfare of farmers. He stressed the importance of organizing such events to sensitize the rural masses to millets. Dr Rachna Singla, Assistant Professor (Horticulture), spoke about nutritional gardening and mushroom cultivation for family nutrition security. Dr. Rajni Goel, Associate Professor (Food Sciences) spoke about the scope of food processing. Dr. Gurupdesh Kaur, Associate Professor (Home Sciences) gave a lecture on nutri-cereals and their role in human health. Participants attended the online nutri-mega enclave hosted by ICAR-IIMR-Hyderabad. Dr Hardeep Singh Sabhikhi, Assistant Professor (Plant Pathology) gave a lecture on the perspectives of beekeeping. The webcast of the ICAR New Delhi program was well attended by the attendees. Vegetable seed kits and fruit plants were distributed to farmers during this campaign. A millets quiz contest was also held at this event and quiz winners Kulwinder Kaur (vill. Inderpura), Gurdeep Kaur (vill. Panaudia), Navpreet Kaur (Nabha), Sandeep Kaur (vill. Mangewal) & Charanjit Kaur (vill. Kallarmajri) received trophies.


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Tom Karwin, on gardening | Succulent Garden Additions – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-succulent-garden-additions-santa-cruz-sentinel/ https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-succulent-garden-additions-santa-cruz-sentinel/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:00:53 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-succulent-garden-additions-santa-cruz-sentinel/

Take care of your garden

This is a great time to add cacti and succulents to your garden as the big sale of the season will take place this weekend (details below).

Full Disclosure: As the past president of the local Cactus and Succulent Society, I have both enthusiasm and commitment to announce this event.

As a reminder, succulents have adapted to their relatively dry native environments by storing moisture in their leaves, stems, or roots. These plants are found in a very wide range of genera, so they are a cultural category and not a botanical division. Cacti are a kind of succulents, although we often see references to “cacti and succulents” as if they were two different groups.

Succulents are gaining popularity among home gardeners for several reasons. There are far too many of them to discuss specific selections, so we offer an overview of the attractiveness of these plants.

Very easy to grow. Although succulents thrive in relatively dry habitats, they do well in the temperate climate of the Monterey Bay area. Most of these plants are used to full sun, but some species prefer partial shade. They all grow best in fast-draining soil, as prolonged time in moist soil can cause root rot.

Cream Spike Agave (A. applanata), a tight rosette of variegated leaves. (Tom Karwin – Contribution)
Agave funkiana ‘Fatal Attraction’, a different form, with several puppies. (Tom Karwin – Contribution)

Very easy to propagate. Many succulents produce (small) suckers that can be easily removed from the mother plant and installed in a new home. This is the simplest method of propagation. The next easiest way is to remove a leaf from a mature plant, let it grow its own roots in a few days or weeks, and install it in the ground. It is also possible to grow succulents from seeds, just like any other plant. This approach (sexual propagation) requires more time but is popular with growers who want to create large numbers of new plants or hybridize new cultivars.

Requires very little water. Like all plants, succulents need moisture. New plants should be irrigated while they are establishing roots, and all plants should be irrigated during very dry periods. There are two broad categories of succulents for irrigation: summer dormant / winter growing and winter dormant / summer growth. Good practice: irrigate as needed during periods of growth and retain water during periods of dormancy. When adding a succulent to your garden, learn when it is growing and when it is dormant by asking the seller or searching the internet for the plant.

Extraordinary range of colors and shapes. Succulents are found in many botanical families and genera. This means that there is great variability within this category of plants and they can appeal to a wide range of aesthetic tastes. They come in many different colors, and some will turn from green to red depending on sun exposure or degree of stress. Certain forms of succulents intrigue some gardeners and displease others. Some cacti and other succulents, for example agaves, have sharp thorns which are beautiful to some observers, but can be dangerous and should be planted away from aisles and handled with care.

Extraordinary range of sizes. Succulents come in all sizes imaginable and are therefore effective in many different landscapes. When choosing a new plant for a specific location in your garden, always learn whether the mature size of the plant will be appropriate for that location.

Fun fact: A friend recently expressed interest in an interesting and colorful succulent called Sticks of Fire (Euphorbia tirucalli), assuming it will be a rather small shrub that is easy to place in the garden. A quick internet search revealed that this plant can grow up to forty feet tall and ten feet wide. In addition, like all Euphorbias, it has a toxic sap which is very irritating in case of contact with the eyes, so it must be handled with great care.

Improve your gardening knowledge

Upcoming webinars:

The Cactus & Succulent Society of America will present a webinar with a catchy title: “Feeding Succulents: How Fertilizer, Water pH, and Soil Can and Should be Adjusted,” at 10 am Saturday. Presenter Ernesto Sandoval will summarize why you want your plants to receive slightly acidic water and the different ways to adjust the pH of your succulents. Sandoval is a knowledgeable and lively lecturer who builds on his botany degree and work over the past thirty years at the University of California Davis, starting as a Weedkiller / Waterer student and progressing to Director / Director of the Conservatory of Botany. In this webinar, he will provide practical information useful to all succulent growers. For more information and to register for this free event, visit cactusandsucculentsociety.org/.

The American Horticultural Society will present a webinar with Karen Washington in an episode of the Society’s webinar series, “Conversations with Great American Gardeners”. This event will take place at 1 p.m. October 8. Washington has been a community gardener and activist in New York City since 1985 and has been recognized for her leadership in this field of gardening. For example, she is the recipient of the 2018 Urban Beautification Award. Holly Shimizu, former executive director of the United States Botanical Garden in Washington, DC, will speak with Washington. To register for this paid event, go to ahsgardening.org/about-us/news-press/ and click on “Introducing Conversations with Great American Gardeners.

The American Horticultural Society also offers a podcast series featuring notable gardening experts. There are several available, well worth the detour. These are free resources, so go to ahsgardening.org/gardening-resources/gardening-podcasts/

Enrich your gardening days

The Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society has had two show and sales events each year for decades, one in the spring and one in the fall. After putting these events on hold during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company announced its first in-person display and sale, as vaccinations and masks allow safe gatherings.

These society events have long provided small growers with a way to sell their plants (and containers), growers and home gardeners to display their precious specimens of cacti and succulents, and home gardeners to add to their collections. at very reasonable prices. . Gardeners can also learn more about these plants by viewing the amazing display plants and asking Society members questions. The goals of the non-profit society include sharing information about this exceptional class of plants.

This year, each of the fourteen growers (at last count) will have tables full of plants to sell. The demand for table space has been quite strong, given the suspension of sales, the Company could therefore accommodate additional vendors by limiting the number of tables that each vendor can fill with plants. Salespeople usually keep their tables full by adding plants as sales create spaces.

The exhibit and sale will take place over two days: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Portuguese Community Hall, 124 Atkinson Lane, Watsonville.

The Company will not require proof of vaccine, but will require all vendors and attendees to wear masks. This will limit the number of people in the room at all times and keep the tables eight feet apart to allow for social distancing. Bring a box to carry your new treasures to your garden. You can also download a poster from mbsucculent.org.

***

Tom Karwin is the past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener (certified 1999- 2009). He is now a board member and garden coach for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society. To consult the qaphotos of his garden daily, https://www.facebook.com/ongardeningcom-566511763375123/. To find an archive of previous gardening columns, visit http://ongardening.com. Contact him with comments or questions at tom@karwin.com.


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On gardening: the partners of the panicle hydrangea have no limit but your imagination | Nation https://rogersgardengate.com/on-gardening-the-partners-of-the-panicle-hydrangea-have-no-limit-but-your-imagination-nation/ https://rogersgardengate.com/on-gardening-the-partners-of-the-panicle-hydrangea-have-no-limit-but-your-imagination-nation/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/on-gardening-the-partners-of-the-panicle-hydrangea-have-no-limit-but-your-imagination-nation/

Panicle hydrangeas, or varieties of Hydrangea paniculata, have skyrocketed in popularity, in large part thanks to growers who have given us more varieties than we ever could have imagined. The Garden Guy is here to tell you that panicle partnerships for the landscape are only limited by your imagination.

If you are wondering “What panicle partnerships? I assure you, you are not alone.

As I walk through the quarters I can tell the shrub looks down below. In other words, we are good at using it against a background of evergreen plants like holly, juniper or magnolias. But incorporating them into the border with flowers must make many gardeners a little uncomfortable.

My first encounter with the possibilities was in the cottage garden when I was director of the Georgia Coastal Botanical Gardens in Savannah, GA. I suspect this happened by accident, but our horticultural coordinator was the poster child for creativity, so it could have been planned.

The hydrangea was Little Lime, a more compact or dwarf cousin of the award-winning Limelight. The suit was not far from my office. Imagine my surprise one day walking to my car when there was Little Lime in bloom among a cluster of bright orange Crocosmia or Montbretia. Lesson # 1 Here are the white flowers, which are most common in the deep south, will pair with any color you want.

Now my son James, who I mention frequently, is like a fierce tiger when it comes to partnering with all varieties of Hydrangea paniculata. Last year, he used Quick Fire hydrangeas in mixed containers at Landings Mall in Columbus, Georgia. In late spring and early summer, customers didn’t even know they were there. Suddenly, in early August, the containers exploded in color, as if each had been carefully designed by an artist.

Partners included Luscious Royale Cosmo lantana, Truffula Pink gomphrena and Rockin Fuchsia salvia. There were also mandevillas, whose flowers imitated ancient climbing roses. Lesson # 2 is that Hydrangea paniculatas can also work in containers.

While containers were a bit higher on the challenge scale, planting in an Old Town house was as easy as two plus two, and two was in the partnership. This jumpsuit featured Limelight, the one that sparked all the hydrangea love, as well as a drift or sweep if you will, of Lavender Verbena Meteor Shower. The marriage of the tall, airy verbena and giant white panicle flowers against the blue sky and white clouds was a Kodak moment. Lesson # 3 is that simple combinations can be the most effective.

These combinations encouraged The Garden Guy to try their hand at designing hydrangea combinations. I planted the Miss Molly buddleia in the background, with the Fire Light Tidbit hydrangea and the Pugster Amethyst buddleia in the front. Truffula Pink gomphrena has also been added to the pockets. Lesson # 4 is that hydrangeas can function anywhere, including pollinator habitat.

I have always maintained that if these hydrangeas grew in the Caribbean, we would think they were the most wonderful tropics on the planet. So I planted a red Abyssinian banana between a triangular cluster of three newly grown Limelight Prime hydrangeas. In the late afternoon with just the right angle of backlit sun, my gaze takes me to the islands with the sound of gentle waves and steel drums. Lesson # 5 is that Hydrangea paniculata is only limited by your imagination.

Of the 49 varieties of hydrangeas offered by Proven Winners, 13 are selections of Hydrangea paniculata. They are recommended in zones 3 to 8b, which is a large geographic area of ​​the country. As you pick the strains you want, don’t forget to let your inner Monet out. You too can create amazing combinations.

____

(Norman Winter, horticulturalist, garden speaker and author of “Tough-as-Nails Flowers for the South” and “Captivating Combinations: Color and Style in the Garden.” Follow him on Facebook @NormanWinterTheGardenGuy.)

(NOTE TO EDITORS: Norman Winter receives free plants to review from the companies he covers.)


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Tips for making your home landscaping stellar https://rogersgardengate.com/tips-for-making-your-home-landscaping-stellar/ https://rogersgardengate.com/tips-for-making-your-home-landscaping-stellar/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 12:58:13 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/tips-for-making-your-home-landscaping-stellar/

If you are looking to improve the exterior of your home, landscaping is the most common way to do it, leaving your home beautiful and green. For people who enjoy outdoor DIY projects, this can be a great way to give your home a personal touch, and for others, you can hire a landscaper. Either way, improving the curb appeal of your home doesn’t have to seem like rocket science. To get you started, here are some tips.

Irrigate only when necessary

Most of the water suppliers have raised concerns about lawn irrigation. Whether it’s commercial properties, sports fields or residential landscaping, the demand for water has increased. Whereas only about 3% water on earth is soft, it is essential to use it responsibly.

If you are in an area with high temperatures and average rainfall, overwatering will stress the grass. This is because the grass is drought tolerant. When you water too much, the grass can turn brown, leaving your property unsightly. Therefore, by adapting smart watering practices, your lawn will be beautiful and healthy all year round.

Use quality garden tools

You will need a few gardening tools to spruce up your home. However, the quality of the garden tools you use is important, especially for DIY enthusiasts. If you buy a cheap tool, it can break in the middle of the job. This then forces you to go back to the store and get another tool, which wastes your time. For some, they may end up postponing work due to frustrations. Even though better tools are a little expensive, they will work effectively and motivate you to keep going.

Increase the cutting height of the lawn mower

When you mow your lawn, especially in summer, don’t mow too close to the ground. Longer grass improves deeper root growth, ensuring your lawn is drought tolerant. Herbaceous plants can take up a lot of space. For example, you can find a million grasses on roughly one quarter acre lawn. The more of them, the fuller your garden. Plus, when you’re not cutting too much, they shade out and minimize evaporation. Therefore, you will not have to water the lawn often.

Don’t forget the Hardscape

When most people think of landscaping, the features of landscaping hardly spring to mind. However, beautifying your walkways and driveways can go a long way in transforming your home. To add character, add plants and outdoor lighting along walkways and walkways for an upgraded look. Just like plants, landscaping elements structure a space. For example, your fences and walls can make a statement about your home even though they frame your property. You can complement your fence with a few plants at the base for a finished look. If you are designing your deck and patios, add plants. You can have a fantastic place to relax, read or just enjoy nature.

Manage your waste well

If you have trees on your property, you will likely need to rake often to get rid of falling leaves, especially in the fall. Instead of sending these leaves to the landfill, mow a small amount on your lawn. It will provide fertilizer for your grass and food for earthworms, thus improving the quality of your soil. Apart from that, you will also be preserving the environment.

Every year, households generate a lot of waste, especially construction waste. In 2018, there were approximately 600 million tonnes construction and demolition (construction and demolition) debris generated, more than double the amount produced by municipal solid waste. By reducing this number of homes at a time, landfill space can be conserved. Therefore, while you are working on your home landscaping, shred these leaves and use them as mulch to keep your lawn healthy.

When improving your landscape, always think about your climate. Opt for plants that are likely to grow well in your area, and incorporate some DIY projects along the way as well. If you follow the tips above, in a few months, your landscape will be the envy of your neighbors.


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Best backyard landscaping ideas of 2021 – Forbes Advisor https://rogersgardengate.com/best-backyard-landscaping-ideas-of-2021-forbes-advisor/ https://rogersgardengate.com/best-backyard-landscaping-ideas-of-2021-forbes-advisor/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 15:08:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/best-backyard-landscaping-ideas-of-2021-forbes-advisor/ Editorial Note: Forbes Advisor may earn a commission on sales made from partner links on this page, but this does not affect the opinions or ratings of our editors.

If a backyard update (or complete overhaul) is the order of the day this spring and summer, you’re not alone. According to a spring 2021 report from Thumbtack, backyard improvements are at the top of the list of projects homeowners plan to undertake in the next few months, and the front yard landscaping is not not the only landscaping that matters.

Landscaping, in particular, is a hot topic – Thumbtack reports that homeowners plan to spend between $ 1,034 and $ 5,720 on their backyard landscaping and design.

If you need inspiration for your garden before you start digging, building, and rotating the soil, here are eight of our favorite landscaping ideas.

1. Incorporate the biophilic design

You don’t have to live among wildlife and ancient trees to become one with nature. By using a mix of natural elements and landscaping, like grass with grass block pavers, you can transform an all-business backyard into a truly serene place (without losing shape and quality. function).

Experts call this concept “biophilic design,” and it’s one of the key landscaping trends this year, says Joe Raboine, director of residential landscaping for Belgard.

If you are looking to connect with nature without leaving your property, incorporating a bit of biophilic design into your landscaping plan is a good choice.

2. Separate your spaces

There’s a lot going on in your backyard: kids jumping on trampolines, dogs running around, gardening, barbecues on weekends, maybe even yoga on Saturday mornings. While it’s possible (and maybe even easier) to establish a multipurpose space, you can also divide and conquer, suggests Pol Bishop, a UK gardening and landscaping expert for Fantastic Gardeners. A dog park on one side, an area for sun salutations in the corner, a children’s area in the center and a special section for your grill, smoker and outdoor bar. A few ways to create these defined spaces are by using hedges, masonry borders, flower beds, and fences.

3. Add a Prefabricated Accessory Housing Unit (ADU)

Going out in your backyard doesn’t necessarily mean going outdoors. If you could use a little extra interior space to renovate your backyard, consider incorporating an accessory living unit into your landscaping.

These quaint units can serve as home offices, guest suites, game / media rooms, workout studios, or even permanent living spaces for family members. While building one from scratch is certainly an option, you can also go the precast route and buy one as a kit.

4. Recreate your happiness

Topiary, the practice of creating ornamental forms from trees and shrubs, ranges from elegant to eccentric. And while basic shapes, like cones, globes, and spirals, are quite common (and perfectly nice for many backyard landscapes), adding topiaries provides the opportunity to add something special. a little more to your backyard – something that shows your personality and is unlikely to replicate in the house across the street.

Distinctive topiary ideas include animal shapes, arches, fences, and furniture (yes, you can make a topiary table or chair). You can also mix topiaries with hardscapes and planters, or even go fancy with a topiary of your favorite Disney character. Other fun ideas include creating a maze, arranging the topiary in the shape of a heart, or creating your life-size animal topiaries.

5. Reduce your dreams

It’s not very often that you hear someone advise you to downplay your aspirations, but, when it comes to backyard landscaping, it might just be what it takes to turn your vision into reality.

For example, if you yearn for a full-scale outdoor kitchen, but you’re working on a limited budget, instead of throwing in the towel because you can’t swing the full cost of a built-in grill and outdoor cabinetry, reinvent the plan to better adapt it to your financial resources. A portable wet bar equipped with storage and a small gas grill, for example, will still allow you to cook and entertain outside without breaking the bank. It doesn’t have to look dull either – you can do as much to spruce up your space with budget outdoor kitchen equipment as you do with high-end options.

6. Landscape with vegetables

A raised bed is not the only suitable place for your garden vegetables. To change the look of your landscape without sacrificing your summer bounty, try planting your tomatoes, peppers, summer squash, cucumbers, and rosemary among your flower beds rather than far from them.

You can also try making a border around your flower beds with your favorite varieties of lettuce or cabbage or, for those who prefer container gardening, you can place pots and other planters in random (albeit respectful) places. plants) in your garden.

7. Think distinctly when choosing the topiary

Topiary, the practice of creating ornamental forms from trees and shrubs, ranges from elegant to eccentric. And while basic shapes, like cones, globes, and spirals, are quite common (and perfectly nice for many backyard landscapes), adding topiaries offers the chance to add something special. ‘a little more to your oasis in the courtyard– something that shows your personality and is unlikely to be replicated in the house across the street.

Distinctive topiary ideas include animal shapes, arches, fences, and furniture (yes, you can make a topiary table or chair). You can also mix topiaries with hardscapes and planters, or even go fancy with a topiary of your favorite Disney character. Other fun ideas include creating a maze, arranging the heart-shaped topiary, or creating your life-size topiary animals.

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