Tree planting – Rogers Garden Gate http://rogersgardengate.com/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 23:03:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rogersgardengate.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Tree planting – Rogers Garden Gate http://rogersgardengate.com/ 32 32 Planting campaign by KSPP students https://rogersgardengate.com/planting-campaign-by-kspp-students/ https://rogersgardengate.com/planting-campaign-by-kspp-students/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 20:50:34 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/planting-campaign-by-kspp-students/ Hyderabad: The first cohort of students from the Kautilya School of Public Policy (KSPP) conducted a planting campaign in Rudraram village, Sangareddy, on September 30. What started as a class activity in a writing class led by New York Times editor-in-chief Professor Glenn Kramon came to fruition within three weeks of its inception. Around 750 […]]]>

Hyderabad: The first cohort of students from the Kautilya School of Public Policy (KSPP) conducted a planting campaign in Rudraram village, Sangareddy, on September 30.

What started as a class activity in a writing class led by New York Times editor-in-chief Professor Glenn Kramon came to fruition within three weeks of its inception. Around 750 seedlings of four varieties were planted under the guidance of the GITAM horticulture wing, whose gardening expertise combined with the vigor of the students made the event a great success.

Prof N Siva Prasad, Pro Vice Chancellor, GITAM Hyderabad, said planting the samples is the first step, watering and maintenance will also be scheduled.

“The foundations of a cultural heritage are being laid today. This cohort will lead the way and pass that legacy on to the next set of students, ”said Sridhar Pabbishetty, Founding Director of KSPP.

“Today, the seeds of future agents of change have germinated as close as possible to the ground, where real change begins,” observes DVVSR Varma, resident director, who facilitated the materialization of the drive.

Students have been pursuing a master’s degree in public policy for a period of two years since August 2021, under the able guidance of Dean Ambassador Syed Akbaruddin and many other pillars of politics, development and the academic arena.


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Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala organizes a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting/ https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 13:02:05 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/krishi-vigyan-kendra-patiala-organizes-a-campaign-on-nutri-garden-and-tree-planting/ PATIALA: Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala in association with IFFCO, Patiala today organized a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting. This campaign was organized to mark the International Year of Millet. In this event, more than 100 farmers participated. Dr Vipan Kumar Rampal, Deputy Director (Trg.), KVK, Patiala, welcomed guests and delivered keynote address on the […]]]>

PATIALA: Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Patiala in association with IFFCO, Patiala today organized a campaign on Nutri-Garden and tree planting. This campaign was organized to mark the International Year of Millet. In this event, more than 100 farmers participated.

Dr Vipan Kumar Rampal, Deputy Director (Trg.), KVK, Patiala, welcomed guests and delivered keynote address on the role of plantations in sustainable agriculture and rural livelihoods. Ch. Bahadur Singh, State Director, IFFCO spoke about IFFCO’s activities for the welfare of farmers. He stressed the importance of organizing such events to sensitize the rural masses to millets. Dr Rachna Singla, Assistant Professor (Horticulture), spoke about nutritional gardening and mushroom cultivation for family nutrition security. Dr. Rajni Goel, Associate Professor (Food Sciences) spoke about the scope of food processing. Dr. Gurupdesh Kaur, Associate Professor (Home Sciences) gave a lecture on nutri-cereals and their role in human health. Participants attended the online nutri-mega enclave hosted by ICAR-IIMR-Hyderabad. Dr Hardeep Singh Sabhikhi, Assistant Professor (Plant Pathology) gave a lecture on the perspectives of beekeeping. The webcast of the ICAR New Delhi program was well attended by the attendees. Vegetable seed kits and fruit plants were distributed to farmers during this campaign. A millets quiz contest was also held at this event and quiz winners Kulwinder Kaur (vill. Inderpura), Gurdeep Kaur (vill. Panaudia), Navpreet Kaur (Nabha), Sandeep Kaur (vill. Mangewal) & Charanjit Kaur (vill. Kallarmajri) received trophies.


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Descendants of Ida’s sheltered slaves in the big house on a historic plantation https://rogersgardengate.com/descendants-of-idas-sheltered-slaves-in-the-big-house-on-a-historic-plantation/ https://rogersgardengate.com/descendants-of-idas-sheltered-slaves-in-the-big-house-on-a-historic-plantation/#respond Sun, 05 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/descendants-of-idas-sheltered-slaves-in-the-big-house-on-a-historic-plantation/ Jo (left), Joy Banner and their parents fled to the large house on Whitney Plantation to weather Hurricane Ida last Sunday. They say their slave ancestors helped build the house. Image: John Burnett / NPR When the Banner family sought refuge from Hurricane Ida, which roared across the Gulf, they searched for the strongest building […]]]>

Jo (left), Joy Banner and their parents fled to the large house on Whitney Plantation to weather Hurricane Ida last Sunday. They say their slave ancestors helped build the house. Image: John Burnett / NPR

When the Banner family sought refuge from Hurricane Ida, which roared across the Gulf, they searched for the strongest building in the small community of Wallace, Louisiana, where they live. So they decided to weather the storm in the Big House on Whitney Plantation.

The banners are black. They have lived for generations on this rich alluvial soil on the banks of the Mississippi River, about 80 kilometers upstream from New Orleans. And they say their slave ancestors helped build this Creole plantation house 230 years ago for a German planter and slave owner named Jean Jacques Haydel.

As it turns out, it was in this white pillared rectory that the Banner sisters, Joy and Jo, and their parents, Harriett and William, fled last Sunday.

Joy Banner shows the two sharecroppers' huts that were flattened by the fierce winds of Hurricane Ida.

Joy Banner shows the two sharecroppers’ huts that were flattened by the fierce winds of Hurricane Ida. Image: John Burnett / NPR

“Just being back here and having the experience of being in the hurricane in this house, literally it was our place of refuge,” says Joy Banner, pacing the land littered with fallen trees. , shattered building materials and broken limbs. “It really made me appreciate the skill, the craftsmanship of the slaves. They weren’t able to have this kind of house for their own protection when a hurricane hit them.”

The Whitney Plantation is not like other historic plantations located along the famous River Road that winds along the Mississippi. This acclaimed plantation museum, on what is known as the German coast, was the first in America dedicated to the narration of the slave experience. Joy Banner, who lives a mile and a half away, is the communications manager here.

She unlocks the padlock and opens a heavy door into the dining room, which is furnished with elegant period cutlery. It is sweltering inside due to the subtropical heat.

“And that’s where we were for 17 hours,” she said, looking around.

At one point the howling wind stopped and the family saw the sun and they thought the storm was over. But when the winds picked up again, they rushed towards the Big House. The eye of Hurricane Ida passed directly over the Whitney. In fact, St. John the Baptist Parish, where it is located, was among the hardest hit by the Category 4 storm and President Biden went there on Friday.

“It was so loud and it looked like the train was passing,” said Harriett Banner. “And you looked out and you saw the beautiful trees and they were everywhere. It was terrifying.”

But they were safe.

Joy Banner runs her palm along the cold plaster that covers the original brick walls over a foot thick.

“This was built in 1791,” she says. “He’s seen hurricanes before. He’s seen (hurricane) Betsy (in 1965), and now he’s seen Ida, the next biggest storm to hit this parish.”

Her twin sister, Jo, intervenes: “It’s so ironic to run to the Big House. I never imagined, as a descendant of the slaves, that we would run to this house.”

In 1819, sixty-one enslaved African men and women lived and worked on the Whitney Plantation. Workers at the big house were cleaning, drawing water from the cistern, cooking, ironing, serving food and drink to the family and fan them while they ate in the sweltering heat, according to Whitney’s website.

The beautiful structure, with its wide gallery on the second floor to catch the river breezes, is considered one of the best examples of decorated timber architecture along River Road. In one room, you can still see the mistress’s initials – “MH” – monogrammed on the living room ceiling.

“As much safety and security as the house has provided us,” says Joy, “there is always a feeling of – you don’t belong here, like the house isn’t for you.”

Ida caused extensive damage on the Whitney plantation.

The original slave quarters still stand, but two sharecroppers’ huts that were brought onto the property were flattened by the fierce winds. The double rows of massive oak trees facing the house lost limbs, but survived. The dovecotes seem to be OK. The majestic whitewashed Antioch Baptist Church – which was built by emancipated slaves and moved here across the river in 1999 – was also heavily damaged. And the storm hit the Whitney Store, which operated until the 1960s, when the plantation was still growing rice and sugarcane for commercial purposes.

Harriett Banner thinks it wasn’t just the thick walls and cypress shutters that protected them. There is a tradition in southern Louisiana that is strongly Catholic that when a hurricane hits you sprinkle blessed bread on St. Joseph’s Day around your home to protect it.

“So I brought my Saint-Joseph bread and then when I arrived at the Big House I sprinkled holy water and I threw the bread around the house and I kept my rosary in my So I prayed and I said, ‘Lord, it’s in your hands’ and that’s what calmed me down, ”she said with a small laugh.

Whitney Plantation has closed for the time being; the research department donations for what will be costly repairs.

As for the Grande Maison, it lost one of the four fireplaces, a few cedar shingles and a few windows. But it weathered the storm just as it had been built.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.
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PICSS has partnered with AAA Associates to undertake a 1,000,000 tree-planting campaign https://rogersgardengate.com/picss-has-partnered-with-aaa-associates-to-undertake-a-1000000-tree-planting-campaign/ https://rogersgardengate.com/picss-has-partnered-with-aaa-associates-to-undertake-a-1000000-tree-planting-campaign/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/picss-has-partnered-with-aaa-associates-to-undertake-a-1000000-tree-planting-campaign/ AAA Associates and the Pakistan Institute for Conflict and Security Studies (PICSS) 1,000,000 plantations opened here in Punjab House Park under the Prime Minister’s call for tree planting ISLAMABAD, (UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News – September 1, 2021): AAA Associates and Pakistan Institute for Conflict and Security Studies (PICSS) 1,00,000 plantations inaugurated here in Punjab […]]]>

AAA Associates and the Pakistan Institute for Conflict and Security Studies (PICSS) 1,000,000 plantations opened here in Punjab House Park under the Prime Minister’s call for tree planting

ISLAMABAD, (UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News – September 1, 2021): AAA Associates and Pakistan Institute for Conflict and Security Studies (PICSS) 1,00,000 plantations inaugurated here in Punjab House Park under the Prime Minister’s call for tree planting.

European Union Ambassador Androulla Kaminara presided over the inauguration ceremony along with other diplomats and dignitaries, including mountaineer Misbah Baig and former Senator Sahar Kamran.

AAA Associates Director Usman Iqbal and AAA Associates Managing Director Shahazad Ali Kiani were present on the occasion.

Ms. Androulla Kaminara praised the environmental awareness of AAA Associates and highlighted the importance of reforestation and its implications for the future.

Speaking on the occasion, AAA Associates Director Usman Iqbal said: “This is an important AAA Associates afforestation initiative to maintain the ecological balance of nature.

Our future generations will benefit from our conscientious decision today. We are committed to making the surroundings beautiful and green, ”he added.

Emphasizing the need to protect and conserve the environment, Shahazad Ali Kiani, MD AAA Associates, said, “AAA Associates has always viewed the green environment as a priority. It helps purify the air, prevent soil erosion, shelter wildlife, and save our energy through shading. We propagate sustainable ways in all of our business practices which also help our nature. In August, as part of the monsoon planting campaign, AAA Associates planted 100,000 saplings at the site near the Simly Dam.


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Gray Oaks Tree Plantation Named Forest Farm of the Year for 2021 https://rogersgardengate.com/gray-oaks-tree-plantation-named-forest-farm-of-the-year-for-2021/ https://rogersgardengate.com/gray-oaks-tree-plantation-named-forest-farm-of-the-year-for-2021/#respond Thu, 19 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/gray-oaks-tree-plantation-named-forest-farm-of-the-year-for-2021/ Robert Walker and Catherine Eastman manage Ohio’s 2021 Tree Farm of the Year, the Gray Oaks Tree Plantation. (Photo by Gail Keck) BELLEFONTAINE, Ohio – A walk in the woods at Gray Oaks Tree Plantation proves that landowners don’t need large areas to maintain a variety of woodland habitats. The 26-acre tree farm located just […]]]>
Robert Walker and Catherine Eastman manage Ohio’s 2021 Tree Farm of the Year, the Gray Oaks Tree Plantation. (Photo by Gail Keck)

BELLEFONTAINE, Ohio – A walk in the woods at Gray Oaks Tree Plantation proves that landowners don’t need large areas to maintain a variety of woodland habitats.

The 26-acre tree farm located just east of Bellefontaine, Logan County, has been named the 2021 Tree Farm of the Year by the Ohio Forestry Association and the Ohio Tree Farm Program.

“It’s not the typical tree farm of the year because of its size, but it well deserves the award,” said Steve McGinnis, state service forester with the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

The owners, Robert Walker and Catherine Eastman, have actively managed the land to establish a variety of woodland habitats, McGinnis explained.

“It appears to be the largest 26 acre wood in the entire state,” he said.

Green area

The land was previously part of a 350-acre tree plantation started in 1958 by the Rowland family, but most of it was destroyed with the construction of the Highway 33 bypass around Bellefontaine.

By the time Walker bought a remaining part of the forest farm in 1987, the trees had not been managed for years, he said. “It was obvious someone had planted them, but they were unfortunately overlooked.”

Walker began working with foresters to create plans to eradicate invasive species and thin out densely planted stands of trees. Now, with Eastman, Walker is working to encourage the growth of a wide range of tree species. Their goal is to nourish and protect their land as green space amid the development that surrounds them.

“Our green spaces are very important to humanity,” Walker said. “Without them, we cease to exist.

Oasis

The Gray Oaks tree plantation takes its name from the scenery Walker saw through his kitchen window on a winter’s day. The farm is bordered to the east by a busy four-lane highway, to the south and west by detached houses and to the north by a church.

Walker considers the tree farm to be an oasis for wildlife and humans.

“You can always maintain these green spaces near highways and facilities,” he said.

As green space shrinks, what is left will become more valuable, Walker said, but he and Eastman are not looking to cash in on their tree farm. Instead, they manage the land to improve the environment for people and wildlife.

“We’re not going to get rich because of it, but in our own way, we are rich,” he said.

Walker works as a facilities manager for the Ohio Hi-Point Career Center and enjoys relaxing evenings and weekends working in the woods.

Eastman works as an elementary school teacher in Bellefontaine, so in addition to evenings and weekends, she has time in the summer to work in the woods. They both see the farm as their vacation spot as well as their home.

Stewardship

The two share their interest in forest stewardship by organizing a field day each year for the fifth grade students of Bellefontaine. They work with foresters, soil conservators and wildlife experts to set up stations around the farm to teach students about invasive species, food webs, wildlife habitat, and other resource-related topics. natural.

These lessons tick the boxes for science learning objectives in grade five and also allow students to experience the wonders of the forest, Eastman said. Over the years, Walker and Eastman have worked with McGinnis and other foresters to develop management plans to guide their efforts.

They like to focus on one area of ​​the property at a time and then let that area rest and recuperate as they move to another location. Their organized and focused approach is part of what makes them exceptional as tree growers, McGinnis said.

When Walker began managing the land in 1987, it was mostly timber, but the woods did not provide the diverse wildlife habitat he wanted.

Past practices

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the land was part of a reforestation project to convert rugged, rolling pastures to forest. At that time, foresters recommended using monocultures and reduced spacing to quickly transform the landscape, Walker explained.

Many of the farm’s Norwegian oaks and spruce trees have been planted in narrow rows just 3 feet apart. This is not a practice that would normally be used nowadays, as such close spacing ends up stunting tree growth. Tree monocultures also provide limited habitat for wildlife compared to forests with various tree species.

One of the first steps was to eliminate the invading Amur Honeysuckle. In addition to crowding out native understory species, honeysuckle shrubs deplete the soil of nutrients and produce allelopathic compounds that inhibit the growth of other plants.

As a result, the soil under the shrubs tends to have poor vegetation cover, which can lead to soil erosion problems.

Walker and Eastman have used a variety of methods to eradicate honeysuckle, including cutting, spraying, and even mulching shrubs with a wood chipper. “We had to use it in some areas because it was so extreme,” Walker explained. Today, the tall honeysuckle shrubs are gone, but new honeysuckle plants still emerge every spring, Eastman added. “We shoot as we go. “

Good management

Removal of invasive shrubs and thinning of overcrowded tree stands allowed native ground covers, shrubs and understory trees to repopulate. But even these desirable species need to be managed, Eastman said. For example, spice bushes and native papayas themselves can become invasive.

In addition to managing their tree stands, Walker and Eastman have worked to improve wetland habitats on the farm. With help from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, they converted a low lying area into a wooded wetland, which provides habitat for migrating waterfowl.

Another place with a natural spring has a shaded spring pool where salamanders flourish. Yet another poorly drained area is managed as a swampy meadow, where moisture-loving trees such as bald cypress, black walnut, and sycamore take root.

So far, they haven’t come close to running out of farm work, Walker said. Invasive species continue to grow, vines threaten to smother desirable trees, desirable species grow in unwanted places, branches fall, trees die, and more trees must be felled to allow the remaining trees to thrive.

Managing a tree plantation is not a job that never ends, he explained. “It is a work in progress.”

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Christie wants archaeologist to verify old Overby plantation site https://rogersgardengate.com/christie-wants-archaeologist-to-verify-old-overby-plantation-site/ https://rogersgardengate.com/christie-wants-archaeologist-to-verify-old-overby-plantation-site/#respond Wed, 18 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/christie-wants-archaeologist-to-verify-old-overby-plantation-site/ Photo by Taylor Robins Mike Christie stands next to historic marker William Thomas Overby. The marker, which sits on land that was once the family’s Overby plantation, incorrectly describes the land as Overby’s birthplace. The Overby family were originally from Virginia and moved to Coweta. The land, which Christie said could include a cemetery, was […]]]>

Photo by Taylor Robins

Mike Christie stands next to historic marker William Thomas Overby. The marker, which sits on land that was once the family’s Overby plantation, incorrectly describes the land as Overby’s birthplace. The Overby family were originally from Virginia and moved to Coweta. The land, which Christie said could include a cemetery, was recently dezoned by the Coweta County Commission.

By TAYLOR ROBINS, taylor@newnan.com

The Coweta County Commission has approved a rezoning that will allow building on a plot that was part of the Overby family plantation, but neighboring resident Mike Christie says the area should first be checked for graves and historic artifacts.

Commissioners recently voted in favor of rezoning the last undeveloped portion of the William H. Overby plantation on January 23. Christie, who lives nearby, said he found nails and other items when he was gardening and was concerned the plot would include the graves of slaves who lived and worked on the plantation before the Civil War.

“If they can’t find anything, I’m sorry I raised a stench,” Christie said. “But I still think it’s the right thing to do, bring in professional archaeologists who have the technology to determine what’s there. Are we going to cement the slaves that might have been buried there? ”

The land has a state historic marker that incorrectly describes the property as the birthplace of William Thomas Overby, who has been nicknamed “the Nathan Hale of Confederation”. According to Carolyn Cary, author of “William Thomas Overby: Proud Partisan Ranger,” what is currently undeveloped on the original 300 acres is private land owned by a current resident of Newnan.

Cary is the author of the book which was published in 2004 on William H. Overby’s son, William T. Overby. The book provides an overview of how the Overby family moved from Virginia to Newnan in 1837. Patriarch Overby is described as a farmer and his son was a Confederate war hero.

“It’s not historic in the sense that George Washington slept there,” Cary said of the land. “It’s historic in the sense that it’s valuable land for Coweta County. And there’s probably not much left there. Is it historically worth it in terms of money?

Cary is also the Fayette County Historian.

According to the federal censuses of the United States of 1850 and 1860, 15 slaves lived on the Overby property. An article on the ABCNews website stated that slaves were typically buried in pine boxes on plantation land, usually in graves that were not marked.

According to the Coweta County Planning Department, they know of no burial grounds on the property. Coweta County does not allow disturbance of a grave. The department consults “Coweta County Georgia Cemeteries,” published in 1986 by the Coweta County Genealogical Society.

For the property, the Coweta County Planning Department has only building permit documents that date back to 1963.

“All I’m asking is a second look here. I think we owe it to the Cowetans who are living today and in the future the lessons we can learn from it. Whether it’s big lessons or sad lessons, we still have to capture and learn from them, ”said Christie.

“I’m a little shocked that this is an overwhelming rezoning on a historic property,” said Christie, adding he was “appalled and disappointed, to be honest.”

Christie, also from Virginia, describes himself as a “history jerk” and a “devoted gardener” who finds old bricks, nails and other old materials in his garden. His house borders the recently rezoned land.

Christie attended the county meeting when the zoning was approved. He said he would like the land to be transformed into an educational or historical center.

According to Coweta County Commissioner Rodney Brooks, since the land is privately owned, there is nothing the county can do.

“I don’t want to stop progress or developments,” Christie said. “I just want someone to do their due diligence and send some sort of archaeological study and find out if there is a cemetery there.”


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Man found dead along road in Hilton Head Plantation https://rogersgardengate.com/man-found-dead-along-road-in-hilton-head-plantation/ https://rogersgardengate.com/man-found-dead-along-road-in-hilton-head-plantation/#respond Sat, 14 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/man-found-dead-along-road-in-hilton-head-plantation/ A Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death of a man at Hilton Head Plantation. Courtesy of BCSO The Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death of a man whose body was found on the side of Sagebush Lane in Hilton Head Plantation on Saturday afternoon. Hilton Head Plantation MPs and security guards […]]]>

A Beaufort County Sheriff's Office is investigating the death of a man at Hilton Head Plantation.

A Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death of a man at Hilton Head Plantation.

Courtesy of BCSO

The Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death of a man whose body was found on the side of Sagebush Lane in Hilton Head Plantation on Saturday afternoon.

Hilton Head Plantation MPs and security guards secured the scene and investigators from the sheriff’s office stepped in to investigate the incident, the sheriff’s office said on Saturday afternoon.

As of 5 p.m., investigators had found no sign of foul play, the sheriff’s office said. No subject was considered to be on the run.

Residents and motorists near Sagebush Lane and High Bluff Road can expect an increased law enforcement presence over the next few hours.

This story was originally published August 14, 2021 5:44 pm.

Karl Puckett covers the City of Beaufort, the Town of Port Royal and other communities north of the Broad River for The Beaufort Gazette and Island Packet. The Minnesota native also worked for newspapers in his home state of Alaska, Wisconsin and Montana.
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14 prequalified bidders to apply for the Samruddhi Mahamarg plantation project https://rogersgardengate.com/14-prequalified-bidders-to-apply-for-the-samruddhi-mahamarg-plantation-project/ https://rogersgardengate.com/14-prequalified-bidders-to-apply-for-the-samruddhi-mahamarg-plantation-project/#respond Thu, 12 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/14-prequalified-bidders-to-apply-for-the-samruddhi-mahamarg-plantation-project/ For planting along the Mumbai-Nagpur Samruddhi Mahamarg axis, 14 agencies have been prequalified. Now these pre-qualified agencies can only submit bids and the lowest bid will get the contract, said an official from the Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation (MSRDC), which is the nodal executing agency for the project. . The manager added: “A total […]]]>

For planting along the Mumbai-Nagpur Samruddhi Mahamarg axis, 14 agencies have been prequalified. Now these pre-qualified agencies can only submit bids and the lowest bid will get the contract, said an official from the Maharashtra State Road Development Corporation (MSRDC), which is the nodal executing agency for the project. . The manager added: “A total of 15 bidders we received, but one is on the blacklist and 14 are therefore confirmed prequalified. The tendering process is expected to be completed within the next 8-10 days.

Along the highway under construction, more than 11 lakh of trees will be planted, including small and medium-sized plants, shrubs, among others. The planting works consist of 15 packages. As the civil works of this project are divided into 16 packages, and one package mainly includes overflights, that is why the plantation consists of 15 packages, the manager informed.

The designated agency planned to look after these plantations for five years. Interestingly, the MSRDC is also planning a drip irrigation system to ensure regular watering of the trees. In addition, artificial water pools will be built for the water supply of plants / trees. In addition, the 24 interchanges of Samruddhi Mahamarg will also be beautified with landscaped gardens, among others, the official said.

At present, work on the 701 km long Samruddhi highway is in full swing. All civil engineering works should be completed within the next 2 years, after which it will be opened to traffic in phases. The road from Nagpur to Shirdi is expected to be open by the end of the year, it seems. The proposed initial delay delayed the dye to pandemic-induced lockdown.

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Posted on: Thursday Aug 12, 2021 9:58 PM IST


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Yemassee annexes DOT-owned land near the Lin Wood plantation https://rogersgardengate.com/yemassee-annexes-dot-owned-land-near-the-lin-wood-plantation/ https://rogersgardengate.com/yemassee-annexes-dot-owned-land-near-the-lin-wood-plantation/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/yemassee-annexes-dot-owned-land-near-the-lin-wood-plantation/ For at least the second time this year, the city of Yemassee quickly voted to annex part of the unincorporated land in Beaufort County to the city limits. during a special meeting. A local environmental group is calling on the city to slow down its land acquisition until it can completely revise its comprehensive plan, […]]]>

For at least the second time this year, the city of Yemassee quickly voted to annex part of the unincorporated land in Beaufort County to the city limits. during a special meeting.

A local environmental group is calling on the city to slow down its land acquisition until it can completely revise its comprehensive plan, which exists to guide growth responsibly.

City leaders argue that the most recently acquired land will not be developed.

Municipal council unanimously – and without discussion – twice voted to annex two stretches of land along US 17 totaling approximately 266.31 acres. The Council voted to approve the annexation at first reading during its ordinary session meeting on July 13 then again on a second reading in a special meeting less than a week later.

As a rule, the board meets once a month.

The first land is about 251 acres next to Tomotley Plantation, which is owned by pro-Trump lawyer Lin Wood and was annexed to the city in February. It begins on Bailey Road and ends at US 17, adjoining the Bull Point Plantation neighborhood. Almost all of the parcel falls within the Huspah Creek watershed.

The second parcel, only 15 acres, is across US 17, adjacent to the Bull Point neighborhood on the southern part of Huspah Creek.

The city says “there is no chance of development since 95% of the plots are waterways” and staff recommend that the area be zoned as a conservation preservation district, according to meeting minutes. Staff also said they would work with local stakeholders “to ensure this essential natural resource is not disrupted for years to come.”

The land belongs to the SC Ministry of Transport, so the council annexation vote is subject to the approval of the SC Ministry of State Administration /State fiscal responsibility authority, Which one is meeting scheduled for August 24. The agenda for this meeting has not yet been posted on the agency’s website.

Since the land is owned by the state, Yemassee cannot levy any taxes or fees on the property.

Ahead of council votes, “the city received correspondence from the state indicating that it had no objection” to the annexation, according to meeting documents.

Although the annexation proposal was only on the city’s agenda last month, a letter from DOT to Yemassee Mayor Colin Moore and City Clerk Matt Garnes saying he had “no objection “to the proposed annexation was dated a few months earlier in March. The letter was signed by Secretary of Transportation Christy A. Hall.

In a public comment letter to the board dated May, former Coastal Conservation League South Coast project manager Juliana Smith urged the board to update its full plan to include “recommendations for upgrading. implementation of an urban growth limit ”showing concerns about rapid annexations. Smith now works for Beaufort County.

The letter notes that the city of Yemassee has grown by more than five square miles in three years.

The city began as a perfect 2 mile circle around the now historic station in 1868 and had grown to around 11 square miles by February when two of the three newly purchased Lin Wood plantations were added to the city. Wood’s lands are 2.2 miles.

City Clerk Garnes said Yemassee had had “an exponential amount of changes for the better” since the last comprehensive plan in 2006, and the council voted to begin looking for a consultant to help continue an upgrade. day.

“The city appreciates the natural beauty that surrounds it and how everything is now,” Garnes said. “Our point of view is to want to play a more active role in the case of the annexation of Huspah Creek”, such as being able to have a faster emergency response and to work proactively on cleaning up the waste. .

“It was the next logical location for us,” he said.

Garnes said the council supported the mission of environmental groups and was eager to work with stakeholders, but that it “also wanted to have a fair opportunity to expand our boundaries and ensure land protection.”

Jessie White, director of the Coastal Conservation League’s south coast office, recently told The Island Packet that the group is trying to establish a working relationship with Yemassee to responsibly support its growth.

White said the group appreciated Yemassee’s efforts to update the comprehensive plan, but feared the city would continue to move forward with large annexations anyway.

“In our mind, if you are annexing large tracts of land which opens up large plots of property which can then be annexed, it is important to have a plan in place,” she said, adding that the problem does not. not always concern the specific property on the agenda but those resulting from it.

“We can appreciate the desire to grow, but growing without a plan is really risky,” White said, noting the city’s proximity to the ACE Basin. “Taking actions that seem incompatible with responsible growth is a growing and continuing frustration for us,” White said.

Stories related to Hilton Head Island Packet

Lana Ferguson typically covers stories in northern Beaufort County, Jasper County, and Hampton County. She joined The Island Packet & Beaufort Gazette in 2018 as a criminal affairs and breaking news reporter. Before coming to the Lowcountry, she worked for publications in her home state of Virginia and graduated from the University of Mississippi, where she was editor of the student daily. Lana was also a member of the University of South Carolina Media Law School in 2019.
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City school organizes planting campaign to connect students with nature | Events Film News https://rogersgardengate.com/city-school-organizes-planting-campaign-to-connect-students-with-nature-events-film-news/ https://rogersgardengate.com/city-school-organizes-planting-campaign-to-connect-students-with-nature-events-film-news/#respond Thu, 05 Aug 2021 06:51:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/city-school-organizes-planting-campaign-to-connect-students-with-nature-events-film-news/ It is always nice when awareness is created about the nature and the value of greenery and recently young schoolchildren have taken up this cause. Malabar Hill Cathedral & John Conon Infant School had an idea to help their students celebrate Friendship Day in the most beautiful way … with nature! They grew saplings for […]]]>
It is always nice when awareness is created about the nature and the value of greenery and recently young schoolchildren have taken up this cause. Malabar Hill Cathedral & John Conon Infant School had an idea to help their students celebrate Friendship Day in the most beautiful way … with nature! They grew saplings for a month and then planted them in four different public gardens in the city with the help of the MCGM (Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai).

How the idea was formed
The event was part of the school’s conscious gardening program which aims to instill a connection with nature among young students. It all started when Jignasa Shah, a school parent who runs a gardening and landscaping business, donated 240 fruit trees to the school. The school then involved its students – who are in the 5-7 age range – and each student received a sapling at home in June. The children fed the saplings for a month and developed a sense of belonging and responsibility for living together with the saplings. Post this, they have been invited to four different public gardens nearby in lots to plant these young fruit trees. The event was scheduled for Friendship Day, August 1, to mark the renewal of friendship with nature.

Sporting their green thumbs

The students visited these four gardens with their parents, the teachers, the principal Ms. Sharmila Lele and the dean of the school Ms. Meera Issacs. A total of 240 fruit trees – mango, chikoo, guava, apple, berry, pomegranate and lime with a lifespan of 50 to 100 years – were planted. The groups followed the appropriate Covid-19 protocols and the event took place over different time slots spread over four hours. It was a learning and enjoyable experience for the students as well as their parents. According to Sharmila Lele, “We planned this program to honor the United Nations Decade for Ecosystem Restoration. The objective was to create a strong student agency while strengthening the children’s sense of responsibility towards the environment. It was great to see the students doing their bit. ”


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