Rogers Garden Gate http://rogersgardengate.com/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:59:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rogersgardengate.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Rogers Garden Gate http://rogersgardengate.com/ 32 32 MARK & BEN CULLEN: There are many benefits to keeping a gardening journal https://rogersgardengate.com/mark-ben-cullen-there-are-many-benefits-to-keeping-a-gardening-journal/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 18:05:05 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/mark-ben-cullen-there-are-many-benefits-to-keeping-a-gardening-journal/ Have you made any New Year’s resolutions? Have you ever given up on some of them? Well, it’s not too late to create a new resolution. Most fail because they are awful. This isn’t a topic about losing weight or saving money, so we think we have a much less terrible proposition: a garden journal. […]]]>

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions? Have you ever given up on some of them?

Well, it’s not too late to create a new resolution. Most fail because they are awful. This isn’t a topic about losing weight or saving money, so we think we have a much less terrible proposition: a garden journal.

A garden journal will provide many of the benefits that these dreadful resolutions are meant to provide.

This will improve your memory as a prompt for seasons to come.

It provides reminders of the many things you planned to follow or just remember.

It will make you a better writer because the only way to improve yourself is to write.

It will educate you by allowing you to dwell more consciously on what you have learned in the garden, and it will save you money by helping you plan your garden more effectively.

Most importantly, it will allow you to get the most out of your garden by encouraging you to dwell more deeply on your gardening experience.

Mark and Ben Cullen – Contribution

Fortunately, you don’t have to embark on this garden journaling journey alone. Sisters and writers Helen and Sarah Battersby have just published the 30th anniversary edition of the Toronto & Golden Horseshoe Gardener’s Journal.

Originally published by well-known Toronto gardener and writer Margaret Bennet-Alder, the Battersby sisters took it over over five years ago and made several incremental improvements by adding the Golden Horseshoe to its official watershed.

Divided into three sections – Journal, Records, and Sources, the Journal keeps your garden deliberations organized, with quick reference in the expansive Sources section for local vendors and professionals who can help guide your inspirations.

This is Mark’s favorite section, which he (true denomination) frequently uses when researching a native plant nursery, horticultural company, or a real person in the gardening business. Want to connect with someone who has experience and knowledge about peonies, daylilies, aster or aspidistras? You will find them in the guide.

In the Journal section, there’s plenty of room to collect your thoughts, with seasonally appropriate prompts to keep you up to date with things in the garden, including helpful tips from experienced gardeners. There is ample space on each page to write down highlights of your gardening experience each day.

Sowing, growing, and keeping records are increasingly popular garden hobbies, especially if you like to be organized. Personally, it’s quick to admit that plants bought and planted are often overlooked, even by Ben’s 30-year-old young spirit. It doesn’t help that none of us appreciate the sight of plastic plant tags, however useful they may be, dominating the landscape.

Templates for keeping records of seed purchases, plants and yields are built into the gardener’s journal, with room for notes to observe your successes and a pocket to store small plastic plant tags.

It is true that we pay the price for our habits, good and bad, exponentially as we age. Gardening and journaling are two habits that have served us well over the years: proven by the Journal’s original author, Margaret Bennet-Alder, who is in good health at age 95. This makes her a role model in this season of resolutions. Rumor has it that she only gave up writing work to take care of other interests.

Get your copy of the Toronto & Golden Horseshoe Gardener’s Journal at any Sheridan Nursery store, as well as at the Toronto Botanical Garden and Royal Botanical Gardens stores or in line.

Mark Cullen is an expert gardener, author, animator, tree advocate, and member of the Order of Canada. Her son, Ben, is a fourth generation urban gardener and graduated from the University of Guelph and Dalhousie University in Halifax. Follow them on markcullen.com, to Instagram and Facebook.

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Tom Karwin, on gardening | The diversity of South African succulents – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-the-diversity-of-south-african-succulents-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 22:02:02 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-the-diversity-of-south-african-succulents-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Take care of your garden With today’s column, after last week’s seasonal pruning preview, we return to our focus on selecting dry plants in the summer for seasonal additions to the garden. Recent columns featured plants native to California, Australia, the Mediterranean Basin, South Africa (perennials), Mexico (perennials), Chile and Mexico (succulents). To view these […]]]>

Take care of your garden

With today’s column, after last week’s seasonal pruning preview, we return to our focus on selecting dry plants in the summer for seasonal additions to the garden. Recent columns featured plants native to California, Australia, the Mediterranean Basin, South Africa (perennials), Mexico (perennials), Chile and Mexico (succulents). To view these columns, go to www.santacruzsentinel.com/ and search for “Karwin”.

We are now focusing on succulents native to South Africa.

Succulents can be found on most continents except Antarctica (not yet!). While some of these plants survive in very harsh dry areas, they more generally thrive in more normal environments that experience seasonal or cyclical droughts. Succulents have adapted to such an environment by storing moisture in their leaves, stems or roots and easily surviving until the rains return.

California gardeners may be more familiar with succulents from neighboring Mexico, but many more succulents come from Africa, with more native succulents than any other continent. The nation of South Africa contains the smallest of the world’s six recognized flower kingdoms, home to 23,420 species of vascular plants, including a huge number of succulents.

In the following paragraphs, we describe several of the South African succulents in my garden, selected to suggest the diversity in shapes and sizes of their plants. This series begins with a sampling of various Aloes, a genus characterized by its rosette shape.

Torch Aloe (Aloe arborescens). This familiar plant grows easily in the Monterey Bay area, reaching 9 feet by 9 feet. Its common name refers to its unbranched inflorescences of coral-red flowers, rising during the winter months to two feet above the foliage.

Short-leaved aloe (Aloe brevifolia). A much smaller plant, this aloe develops clumps of three-inch-wide rosettes, with spikes of tubular orange flowers in late spring. It serves as a “filler” plant in the garden.

Aloe Soap (Aloe maculata). This plant was known as A. saponaria, in reference to the soapy foam produced from its sap. Its current species name means “speckled”, in reference to the coloring of its leaves. This plant is easily spread by underground suckers.

Spotted Aloe (Aloe ‘Wrasse’). An example of a Fantasy Aloe, a colorful miniature plant in Larry Weisel’s Fish Hybrid series. Fantastic aloes, popular with succulent collectors, often have a complex parentage resulting from multiple crosses in search of attractive foliage.

Finger Aloe (Orbiculate Cotyledon). Despite its common name, this plant is not an aloe but a cotyledon, a member of another family of plants. It grows 2 feet tall and 4 feet wide, and in spring produces intriguing clusters of pale orange, bell-shaped flowers that hang from stems 12 to 18 inches tall.

Red carpet (Crassula pubescens ssp. Radicans). This member of the Crassula plant family is a carpet-forming plant only a few inches in height, with slender stems that start upright and spread sideways over time and form new shoots emerging from nodes. Its small white flowers look like wreaths. This plant serves as a ground cover.

Corn ear cactus (Euphorbia mammillaris). This plant is not part of the Cactus family, but like some other Euphorbias, it looks like a cactus. It grows about 1 foot tall and grows new columnar stems from its base.

Hottentot bread (Fockea edulis). An example of a caudiciform plant, it stores moisture in its root (caudex), which can grow to 2 feet wide and support thin branches up to 12 feet long. The plant can be kept small when containerized. The common name, which refers to the edible root, is considered derogatory when applied to people. The Afrikaans common name “Bergbaroe” might be preferred.

Cow Tongue Pactus (Gasteria ‘Little Warty’). This charming five inch tall and wide succulent plant is a hybrid of G. batesiana and G. ‘Old Man Silver’. Its cultivar name refers to the small bumps on the thick green leaves.

Paddle plant (Kalanchoe thyrsiflora ‘Flapjacks’). This member of the Stonecrop plant family stands 18 inches tall, with a 30 inch spike of fragrant yellow flowers in spring. With sufficient exposure to the sun, the edges of the leaves turn bright red.

Pink ice plant (Oscularia deltoides). This plant spans a carpet 10 inches high and 3 feet wide, with numerous 1 inch lavender pink flowers resembling daisies. It works well as a ground cover and will cascade from a container or other raised location.

Food for elephants (Portulacaria afra). This plant can be pruned to keep it at a preferred size, but in the wild it can grow to twelve feet tall, deserving of its common name. It has pretty reddish-brown stems, half-inch-long emerald green leaves, and tiny pale lavender flowers in summer.

Advance your knowledge

The Cactus and Succulent Society of America resumes its bi-weekly webinar series with “Succulent Trees — Cultivation,” at 10 am Saturday. Presenter Dan Mahr will follow his previous succulent tree webinar. To register for this free event, go to cactusandsucculentsociety.org/.

The University of California Botanical Garden has announced webinars for January. For more information and to register, visit Botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu/Programs, click on “Programs & Workshops”, then “Calendar”. It involves more clicks than it should, but you can do it.

“Opening reception – Plantes illustrated 2022 The beauty of leaves”, 6:00 pm. January 14. This virtual gathering celebrates the opening of the 13th annual botanical art exhibition 2022, “The Beauty of the Leaves”.

“Florilegia: From Historic Voyages to the Present-day Revival”, 10:00 am January 24th. This is a paid event.

“Inside the Artist’s Studio: Amber Turner and Maria Cecilia Freeman” at 10 am on January 28. This paid event features two botanical artists from the Northern California Society of Botanical Artists.

Enjoy your garden!

Tom Karwin is the past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener (Certified 1999- 2009). He is now a board member and garden trainer for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society. To view photos of his garden daily, https://www.facebook.com/ongardeningcom-566511763375123/. For gardening coaching information and an archive of previous gardening columns, visit http://ongardening.com. Contact him with comments or questions at tom@karwin.com.


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Seasonal pruning in the new year https://rogersgardengate.com/seasonal-pruning-in-the-new-year/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 14:35:35 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/seasonal-pruning-in-the-new-year/ Many people enjoy the annual ceremony of changing the schedule, looking back on the previous year, anticipating the new year, and resolving to pursue new, personally productive directions. While I have a lot of ideas in this direction for myself, I was impressed with Melody Rose’s ideas for revolutions for gardeners. Here are the highlights […]]]>

Many people enjoy the annual ceremony of changing the schedule, looking back on the previous year, anticipating the new year, and resolving to pursue new, personally productive directions.

While I have a lot of ideas in this direction for myself, I was impressed with Melody Rose’s ideas for revolutions for gardeners. Here are the highlights from his article on the Dave’s Garden website (to read it all, visit davesgarden.com and search for “resolutions”):

  • Leave things a little messy.
  • Don’t waste water.
  • Share with others.
  • Identify your insects.

Our gardens follow nature’s annual cycles, ignoring specific dates, crossing the seasons, and responding to climatic and other influences of their unique circumstances. As gardeners, we draw inspiration from these natural processes.

Take care of your garden

At this time of year, the gardener should plan to prune his shrubs.

Pruning schedules can seem difficult, but two basic rules are useful: prune summer flowers in late winter or early spring, and prune spring flowers soon after flowering.

These rules reflect the flowering cycles of these groups. The summer flowering shrubs bloom on the current year’s growth; spring-flowering shrubs bloom on the shoot from the previous year.

The gardener must create an inventory of the shrubs in his landscape, listing them as summer or winter blooms. The gardener knowing the flowering period of each shrub could accomplish this task by working from memory. Others might search for each shrub in a plant directory or on the Internet, using either the plant’s botanical name (ideally) or its common name.

Useful print resources include the “Western Garden Book” by Sunset and “AZ Encyclopedia of Garden Plants” or “Pruning & Training” from the American Horticultural Society. Search Amazon.com, your public library, or your local bookstore for other books on pruning garden plants. Print or online resources could also provide detailed pruning recommendations.

Once prepared with information about your flowering shrubs, you can plan your pruning activities with confidence.

Next, consider different methods of pruning. Be aware that only gardeners, not plants, need to be pruned. Gardeners choose to prune plants for specific purposes: controlling size and shape, promoting more flowers, removing broken or dead branches, and more. Plan to prune your shrubs to achieve these goals, while respecting the natural shape of the plant. If such goals are not a priority, you can choose to ignore the size altogether.

Many shrubs can be improved in size or shape by selectively cutting off branches that reach into alleys or encroach on adjacent plants. However, with older or overgrown shrubs, rejuvenation or renewal techniques might be appropriate.

Rejuvenation pruning involves cutting all the stems of the plant to the ground. Many deciduous shrubs respond well to this approach: new stems grow in one season from well-established roots.

Renewal pruning is more systematic and suitable for multi-stem shrubs. Cut off about a third of the oldest stems on the ground to open up the shrub’s structure and encourage new growth from the base.

Here are examples of seasonal pruning in my garden at this time of year.

Roses include many varieties, most of which are popular in many gardens and should be pruned in late winter or early spring to maintain an attractive shape and promote flowering. Specific advice on pruning roses is available on the American Rose Society website. Go to (www.rose.org/) and search for “pruning”.

Most gardens have spring blooming roses primarily, but a few varieties of roses should be pruned in summer rather than winter. Rambler roses, for example, should be pruned in the summer after flowering. My garden has a vigorous climbing plant, Rosa mulligani, which needs to be contained in the summer after its flowers have wilted.

Marguerite (Montanoa grandiflora). A large, upright evergreen shrub native to Mexico that produces lots of white daisy-like flowers with an attractive scent that suggests chocolate or vanilla. Each year it can be greatly reduced to stimulate new growth from the ground up.

Bolivian Fuchsia (Fuchsia boliviana ‘Alba’). It is a fast-growing evergreen shrub that can exceed twelve feet in height, growing wild in its native regions of southern Peru, Bolivia, and northern Argentina. In the garden, its size can be controlled with annual rejuvenation pruning, after which it produces abundant new growth and charming flower clusters.

Flowering Current or Gooseberry (Ribes spp.), Native to California, can grow up to 12 feet tall and wide, making it large enough for many gardens (including mine). It can be cut any time after the flowers have faded in the summer until March or even April, after which it will produce new growth and flowers the following season. My garden features white, pink and red flowering streams (R. sanguineum) and a fuchsia flowering gooseberry (R. speciosum) with interesting flowers and thorns. All can be trimmed the same way.

Lewis’s Mock Orange (Philadelphus lewisii). This deciduous shrub, native to northern California and western North America, grows up to nine feet tall, with an abundance of white flowers that smell like orange blossom. This plant does not need to be pruned, but the renewal pruning (described above) will make it a good garden companion and promote flowering.

Salvia spp. These plants are widespread members of the large sage family. According to Wikipedia, salvias grow in Central and South America (around 600 species); Central Asia and the Mediterranean (250 species); and East Asia (90 species). Among the many species of this genus, some bloom in winter, spring, summer or fall. They stand out well in rejuvenating pruning, preferably at a time related to the specific plant’s flowering cycle. For sizing recommendations, visit the excellent Flowers by the Sea website (ftbs.com) and search for “Salvias by Season” or by botanical name.

Mexican Marigold (Tagates Lemonii). This popular plant can be seen in many gardens as it grows easily in sun or partial shade and produces an abundance of golden blooms with a scent that many gardeners shy away from. After its flowers fade away in the fall (varying depending on exposure), rejuvenating pruning controls its size and results in new growth and another flowering season.

Cotoneaster spp. This is another large genus with several species within the rose family, ranging from ground covers to tall, upright shrubs. Typically, pruning should be done in late winter and designed to maintain the shrub’s naturally graceful shape. For recommendations, go to the Gardening Know How website (www.gardeningknowhow.com/) and search for “cotoneaster size”. If you know the species of your cotoneaster, search for it on the Internet, using Google.

Enrich your gardening days

A fundamental strategy for the comfort, enjoyment, and ultimate success of gardening is to advance your knowledge and skills in pruning plants. This task, linked to plant growth cycles, has seasonal priorities like those described in today’s column, and involves year-round awareness of the benefits of selective pinching, mowing and pruning. A New Years resolution to consider would be to add a good book on pruning to your reading list.

Enjoy your garden!

Tom Karwin is the past president of Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and a UC Master Gardener. He is now a board member and garden trainer for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society.


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MARK AND BEN CULLEN: Lessons from a Gardening Column https://rogersgardengate.com/mark-and-ben-cullen-lessons-from-a-gardening-column/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 13:49:40 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/mark-and-ben-cullen-lessons-from-a-gardening-column/ As we move into a new year, we look back at the columns we’ve written for you (and researched), keeping an eye out for the highlights. Here are some of the thoughts we shared that we believe deserve another look. Mark and Ben Cullen – Contribution “Rot and rot are your friends.” Last December, we […]]]>

As we move into a new year, we look back at the columns we’ve written for you (and researched), keeping an eye out for the highlights.

Here are some of the thoughts we shared that we believe deserve another look.

Mark and Ben Cullen – Contribution

“Rot and rot are your friends.”

Last December, we wrote about the benefits of installing an insect hotel in your backyard and contradicted the popular idea that the garden is a place of order and storage. The idea of ​​creating habitat and providing food for beneficial insects is still a relatively new idea to many gardeners. But it is gaining ground. We approved of the idea of ​​leaving dead leaves in your garden for a while. Now is not the time to bring beneficial wildlife to your garden. Our insect hotels are now taking reservations for spring.

“Basil is an anomaly.”

Without pollinators, 30% of our food would not be produced. So why not maximize the number of pollinators in your garden with plants that are both flowering and good to eat? We have spoken of herbs as a family of plants which are perfect for this purpose. They are compact, require little maintenance, and produce a lot of food. Basil is the only popular herb that requires a lot of water and sun to function well. An abnormality.

“Of all the families in the plant world, none produces as many blank manholes as the evergreen deciduous leaves.”

What are deciduous conifers and why would you plant them? They offer attractive foliage year round, most bloom and attract pollinators (see a developing theme here?), And they’re generally fairly easy to grow. Look for euonymus, boxwood, yews, and holly. And plan to enjoy the foliage all year round.

“At the factory, we planted a plant.

Interpretation: At the plant we put a botanical species in the ground. We have fun with our column. In September, we implored readers to plant and keep planting. Quote from the now famous Peter Wohlleben, author of The Hidden Life of Trees, who reminds us that trees produce rain. If we were to cut down all the trees in Canada, rain would only occur within 50 km of oceans or large bodies of fresh water. Our country would become a desert. Who said that what we do in the garden has no impact on the environment? What do sedum (hens and chicks), Russian sage and ornamental grasses have in common? They are determined and independent plants that require very little maintenance. Unlike humans who after birth need more TLC than any other mammal, there are some plants you can ignore. Our column has listed and explained many of them.

“Goldenrod is the new milkweed”.

At the end of October, we exhibited the virtues of the native goldenrod (Solidago Canadensis) as it attracts a multitude of beneficial insects and songbirds. And to think that many municipalities still classify it as a noxious weed. Only a few years ago the milkweed shared this space, but we learned best when it became known that it is the exclusive host for monarch larvae. What is today’s nuisance that will be redeemed tomorrow? Stay tuned. You will learn it here.

We have suggested that the cardinal rule for attracting birds to your garden is to leave your perennials upright for the winter. Hydrangea and other flowering shrubs too. See? Not all of our columns have ‘things to do’ that you can display on the refrigerator. Here we suggest you relax and enjoy the sofa for a while.

We are busy researching and writing our columns for the New Year as we speak. We continue our commitment to providing you with the inspiration to get out there and enjoy the benefits of gardening and the practical tips you can use. Good year.

Mark Cullen is an expert gardener, author, animator, tree advocate, and member of the Order of Canada. Her son, Ben, is a fourth generation urban gardener and graduated from the University of Guelph and Dalhousie University in Halifax. Follow them on markcullen.com, on Instagram and Facebook.



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Landscape and Gardening Services Market Size, Share and Trends 2022-2028 – Naks Gardens, SUPERSCAPES, The Friendly Plant Pty Ltd – Industrial IT https://rogersgardengate.com/landscape-and-gardening-services-market-size-share-and-trends-2022-2028-naks-gardens-superscapes-the-friendly-plant-pty-ltd-industrial-it/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 05:20:47 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/landscape-and-gardening-services-market-size-share-and-trends-2022-2028-naks-gardens-superscapes-the-friendly-plant-pty-ltd-industrial-it/ The most recent statistical survey report on the landscaping and gardening services market involves a comprehensive assessment of the landscaping and gardening services industry, presenting the variables that will affect the revenue stream of the market. company during the evaluated course of events. In addition, it gives an expressive framework of the possibilities open in […]]]>

The most recent statistical survey report on the landscaping and gardening services market involves a comprehensive assessment of the landscaping and gardening services industry, presenting the variables that will affect the revenue stream of the market. company during the evaluated course of events. In addition, it gives an expressive framework of the possibilities open in the sub-promotions close to the measures to take advantage of something almost identical.

The analyst presents a detailed picture of the market through the study, synthesis and summation of data from multiple sources by analysis of key parameters. Our Landscape and Gardening Services Market report covers the following areas:

  • Sizing the landscaping and gardening services market
  • Landscape and Gardening Services Market Forecast
  • Landscape and Gardening Services Market Analysis

Competitive analysis:

The landscaping and gardening services market report includes information on product launches, sustainability, and outlook for key vendors, including: (Naks Gardens, SUPERSCAPES, The Friendly Plant Pty Ltd, Living Green Landscapes, Petro Landscaping, Adams Gardens, The Landscape Garden Company, Country Life Gardens, Aquascapes)

Sample request with full table of contents and figures and graphics @ https://crediblemarkets.com/sample-request/landcaping-and-gardening-services-market-232723?utm_source=Sneha&utm_medium=SatPR

The report includes Competitive Analysis, a proprietary tool to analyze and assess the position of companies based on their Industry Position Score and Market Performance Score. The tool uses various factors to categorize players into four categories. Some of these factors considered for the analysis are financial performance over the past 3 years, growth strategies, innovation score, new product launches, investments, market share growth, etc.

Market segmentation

The landscaping and gardening services market is split by type and by application for the period 2021-2028, the growth among the segments provides accurate fireworks and sales forecast by type and by application in terms of volume and production. value. This analysis can help you grow your business by targeting qualified niche markets.

By types

Equipment
Raw material
Labor department

By applications

Residential
Commercial and Industrial
Government and Institutional

Regional analysis of the global landscaping and gardening services market

All the regional segmentation has been studied on the basis of recent and future trends, and the market is forecast throughout the forecast period. The countries covered in the regional analysis of the Global Landscaping and Gardening Services Market report are United States, Canada and Mexico in North America, Germany, France, United Kingdom, in Russia, Italy, Spain, Turkey, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium and the rest of Europe in Europe, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, China, Japan, India, Korea South, Rest of Asia-Pacific (APAC) Asia-Pacific (APAC), Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, South Africa, Egypt, Israel, Rest of Middle East and Africa ( MEA) being part of the Middle East and Africa (MEA), and Argentina, Brazil and the rest of South America being part of South America.

Direct purchase this market research report now @ https://crediblemarkets.com/reports/purchase/landcaping-and-gardening-services-market-232723?license_type=single_user;utm_source=Sneha&utm_medium=SatPR

Main points covered by the table of contents:

To present: Besides a detailed overview of the global Landscaping and Gardening Services market, this segment provides an overview of the report to give insight into the nature and substance of the review study.

Analysis of the main players’ strategies: Market players can use this analysis to gain competitive advantage over their competitors in the Landscaping and Gardening Services market.

Study on the main market trends: This part of the report offers a more meaningful assessment of recent and future examples of the market.

Market Forecast: Buyers of the report will tackle accurate and approved valuations of all market sizes in terms of value and volume. The report further gives usage, creation, offerings, and different conjectures for the Landscape and Gardening Services market.

Analysis of local growth: All critical regions and countries have been covered in the report. Neighborhood review will help uplift players to exploit rejected common business areas, prepare express philosophies for target regions, and consider improving each regional market.

Segment analysis: The report gives accurate and solid guesses about the share of the pie of significant parts of the Landscaping and Gardening Services market. Market members can use this review to pinpoint key interests in key development pockets of the market.

Do you have a specific question or requirement? Ask our industry expert @ https://crediblemarkets.com/enquire-request/landcaping-and-gardening-services-market-232723?utm_source=Sneha&utm_medium=SatPR

Key questions answered in the report:

  • What will be the rate of development of the Landscape and Gardening Services market?
  • What are the key factors driving the global Landscape and Gardening Services market?
  • Who are the main manufacturers in the market?
  • What are the market openings, the market risks and the main lines of the market?
  • – What are the sales, revenue, and price analyzes of the major manufacturers of the Landscaping and Gardening Services market?
  • Who are the distributors, traders and resellers of the Landscaping and Gardening Services market?
  • What are the Landscaping and Gardening Services market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors of the global Landscaping and Gardening Services industries?
  • What is Offerings, Revenue, and Value Review by Types and Uses in the Market?
  • What is the Review of Transactions, Revenue and Value by Business Line?

About Us

Credible Markets is a new age market research company with a firm grip on the pulse of global markets. Credible Markets has become a reliable source for the market research needs of companies in a rapid period of time. We have partnered with leading market information publishers and our reporting pool coverage spans all key industry verticals and thousands of micro markets. The massive repository allows our clients to choose from recently published reports from a range of publishers who also provide in-depth regional and national analysis. Plus, pre-booked research reports are some of our best deals.

The collection of market information reports is regularly updated to provide visitors with easy access to the most recent market information. We provide round-the-clock support to help you reuse search parameters and thus benefit from a full range of reserved reports. After all, it’s all about helping you make an informed strategic decision about purchasing the right report that meets all of your market research demands.

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Gardening column: yellow flowering mahonias glow in winter | Chroniclers https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-column-yellow-flowering-mahonias-glow-in-winter-chroniclers/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/gardening-column-yellow-flowering-mahonias-glow-in-winter-chroniclers/ October through January is the flowering season for three mahonias that do well in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and throughout the Southeastern United States. Based on my experience, I recommend the three shade loving evergreen shrubs with “daffodil colored flower spikes” as described by Elizabeth Lawrence (“A Southern Garden”, UNC Press, 1991, p . […]]]>

October through January is the flowering season for three mahonias that do well in the Lowcountry of South Carolina and throughout the Southeastern United States. Based on my experience, I recommend the three shade loving evergreen shrubs with “daffodil colored flower spikes” as described by Elizabeth Lawrence (“A Southern Garden”, UNC Press, 1991, p . 7).

Leather-leaved mahonia (Berberis bealei, Previously Mahonia bealei) is the most famous Mahonia in the South East. Other common names are eastern holly and Beale’s barberry, the English translation of the new Latin botanical name. Gardeners who have barberry will recognize the similarities between the flower shapes of the two plants.

The architecture of the leather-leaved mahonia is striking enough to be the focal point of a landscape. Steve Bender, editor of “The New Southern Living Gardening Book” (Oxmoor House, 2015, p. 427) writes that it has a “strong pattern of vertical stems, horizontal foliage” and is a “distinguished plant against stone, brick, wood, glass. ” This recommendation led me to place my two plants in front of the brick facade of my house.

Lawrence, Charlotte’s outspoken garden columnist, had a different opinion. Despite her praise of winter flowers, she warned, “In poor soil, it is long and unattractive.” If a leather-leaved mahonia gets too much afternoon sun, like one of my plants does, it will also become tinny as it sheds its lower leaves prematurely.

Gardening column: history and traditions of mistletoe

Leather-leaved Mahonia can grow to 10 feet tall, but my plants seem to grow to 5 feet before they get long. Flower spikes are 3-4 inches long with up to 50 yellow flowers per spike. They bloom from late December to mid-February.






Mahonia Soft Caress Flowers

Mahonia Soft Caress does not have sharp tips on its leaves, hence its common name. The long leaves and narrow leaflets are described as ferns or bamboos. Anthony Keinath / Supplied




Leather-leaved Mahonia is on invasive plant lists in several southeastern states, but not in South Carolina. Mockingbirds love the fleshy blue berries and spread the seed in wild areas.

Sweet caress (Mahonia eurybracteata) is a popular small mahonia from the Southern Living Plant Collection. It is well suited to living in the ground or in large pots, with an adult size of 3 feet tall by 3 ½ feet wide.

This mahonia does not have sharp tips on its leaves, like the leather-leaved mahonia, hence the common name Soft Caress. The long leaves with narrow leaflets are described as ferns or bamboos.

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Of the three mahonias mentioned in this article, Soft Caress flowers first, from October 8 (in 2013 and 2021) until November 11 (in 2018). The flower spikes resemble those of the leather-leaved mahonia.

Soft Caress is damaged by snow and prolonged cold temperatures. In January 2018, my plants froze almost to the ground but quickly grew back. A young cottontail rabbit, who apparently couldn’t find enough to eat that spring, regularly ate the new growth until I surrounded the plants with wire mesh.

Gardening column: 2021, a year of the first gardening

One of the more recent mahonias is Marvel, a hybrid cultivar (Mahonia × media) introduced by Southern Living. The Leather-leaved Mahonia is one of its parents. Marvel’s notable characteristics, compared to the Leather-leaved Mahonia, are vertical growth with a main stem, larger, more showy flowers, and less pungent leaves.






Mahonia Marvel Flowers

One of the newer mahonias is Marvel, a hybrid cultivar introduced by Southern Living. The Leather-leaved Mahonia is one of its parents. Compared to the leather-leaved mahonia, Marvel has larger, more showy flowers and less pungent leaves. Anthony Keinath / Supplied




According to Southern Living Plants, Marvel is 6 feet tall by 4 feet wide. My plant, which has been in place for three years, will probably reach this height but may be narrower. It grew 8 inches in 2021. The plant has a lateral stem with a cluster of flowers as tall as on the main stem.

Flower spikes on Marvel are 8-10 inches long with around 70 flowers per spike. This year, the flowers began to open on December 10. The leaves are up to 15 inches long with 10 pairs of leaflets plus a terminal leaflet.

All three mahonias need moist soil with a good dose of compost to thrive.

Leatherleaf and Soft Caress mahonias may require pruning if the stems become long. The general rule of thumb to correct leg growth on shrubs is to prune one-third of the stems each spring. The stems should be cut to a lateral growth point or, if there is none, to the ground. This gradual trimming gives the plant a somewhat natural look, instead of being heavily sheared, and preserves productive leaves on the remaining stems as the plant produces new stems.

Soft Caress and Marvel are good substitutes for Leather Leaf Mahonia in South Carolina.

Anthony keinath is professor of plant pathology at the Clemson Coastal Research & Education Center in Charleston. His expertise is in vegetable diseases. He is also an avid gardener. Contact him at tknth@clemson.edu.


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Benefits of edible landscaping in your yard https://rogersgardengate.com/benefits-of-edible-landscaping-in-your-yard/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:58:04 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/benefits-of-edible-landscaping-in-your-yard/ The herald Vibrant blooms nestled among fresh herbs and crisp lettuce leaves, all beautifully arranged before moving from garden to plate – this is the concept of edible landscaping, a method of gardening that is as much about aesthetics as well as functionality and durability. The rate at which we consume resources and generate waste […]]]>

The herald

Vibrant blooms nestled among fresh herbs and crisp lettuce leaves, all beautifully arranged before moving from garden to plate – this is the concept of edible landscaping, a method of gardening that is as much about aesthetics as well as functionality and durability.

The rate at which we consume resources and generate waste is one of the main goals of society right now.

As the movement to be more environmentally friendly flourishes, people are learning that their day-to-day lifestyle choices have a significant impact on the environment.

Most of these small changes can be made at home through ways like recycling garbage, composting, and being more eco-conscious when it comes to gardening. How many times do we spend a Sunday morning trimming hedges, mowing lawns and watering unnecessary landscaped shrubs when the edible plants are equally attractive, produce fresh crops and only require a little more maintenance? ?

Statistics published by Lowes reveal that on a hot day, which is common during sweltering summers in sunny South Africa, the average lawn can use 473 gallons of water per 93 square meters.

The same lawn in cool, cloudy weather uses as little as 37 gallons of water. While your biggest concern may be the expense, when you waste water or use too much household water, you are also wasting the energy-intensive purification process.

According to Stanford Mag: “The food industry is a major player in environmental issues such as deforestation, land use change, wasted water and excessive fertilizer runoff. Not to mention the greenhouse gas emissions associated with agriculture, shipping, food processing and storage.

Additionally, plastic bags, styrofoam trays, cardboard boxes, and other forms of single-use packaging that will likely end up clogging landfills increase with every grocery transport. As a personal benefit, you also reduce a good chunk of your monthly grocery bill.

But won’t we miss out on the beauty of an aesthetic garden? As cheerful as sunflowers or creeping succulents can be, it’s important to choose plants that are not only visually appealing, but also attract pollinating insects, are wildlife-friendly, and consumable.

Without converting your entire garden into a fruit and veg plantation, edible landscaping is a little push towards subsistence farming that combines conventional planting with row cultivation techniques (planting in rows with spaces between them. two) to produce a visually appealing and environmentally friendly product. countryside. The overall effect is rustic, like something out of a storybook set in the countryside.

An edible garden is the perfect opportunity to rethink its layout. The trick is not to overcrowd your garden with too many unnecessary plants. Instead, combine crops and other pretty plants that are good growing companions.

All vegetables and fruit plants produce flowers, so with this method of planting you will achieve the goal of making the most of your space visually and functionally. No area of ​​your garden will be wasted with dead zones that offer nothing but a draw for resources. – iolnews.


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Tom Karwin, on gardening | Seasonal pruning in the New Year – Santa Cruz Sentinel https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-seasonal-pruning-in-the-new-year-santa-cruz-sentinel/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 22:02:50 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/tom-karwin-on-gardening-seasonal-pruning-in-the-new-year-santa-cruz-sentinel/ The gardening and astronomical years Many people enjoy the annual ceremony of changing the schedule, looking back on the previous year, anticipating the new year, and resolving to pursue new, personally productive directions. While I have a lot of ideas in this direction for myself, I was impressed with Melody Rose’s ideas for revolutions for […]]]>

The gardening and astronomical years

Many people enjoy the annual ceremony of changing the schedule, looking back on the previous year, anticipating the new year, and resolving to pursue new, personally productive directions. While I have a lot of ideas in this direction for myself, I was impressed with Melody Rose’s ideas for revolutions for gardeners. Here are the highlights from his article on the Dave’s Garden website (to read it all, visit davesgarden.com and search for “resolutions”):

• Leave things a bit messy.
• Don’t waste water.
• Share with others.
• Identify your insects.

Our gardens follow nature’s annual cycles, ignoring specific dates, crossing the seasons, and responding to climatic and other influences of their unique circumstances. As gardeners, we draw inspiration from these natural processes.

Take care of your garden

At this time of year, the gardener should plan to prune his shrubs.

Pruning schedules can seem tricky, but two basic rules are useful: prune summer flowers in late winter or early spring, and prune spring flowers soon after blooming.

These rules reflect the flowering cycles of these groups. The summer flowering shrubs bloom on the current year’s growth; spring-flowering shrubs bloom on the shoot from the previous year.

The gardener must create an inventory of the shrubs in his landscape, listing them as summer or winter blooms. The gardener knowing the flowering period of each shrub could accomplish this task by working from memory. Others might search for each shrub in a plant directory or on the Internet, using either the plant’s botanical name (ideally) or its common name.

Useful print resources include the “Western Garden Book” by Sunset and “AZ Encyclopedia of Garden Plants” or “Pruning & Training” from the American Horticultural Society. Search Amazon.com, your public library, or your local bookstore for other books on pruning garden plants. Print or online resources could also provide detailed pruning recommendations.

Once prepared with information about your flowering shrubs, you can plan your pruning activities with confidence.

Next, consider different methods of pruning. Be aware that only gardeners, not plants, need to be pruned. Gardeners choose to prune plants for specific purposes: controlling size and shape, promoting more flowers, removing broken or dead branches, and more. Plan to prune your shrubs to achieve these goals, while respecting the natural shape of the plant. If such goals are not a priority, you can choose to ignore the size altogether.

Many shrubs can be improved in size or shape by selectively cutting off branches that reach into alleys or encroach on adjacent plants. However, with older or overgrown shrubs, rejuvenation or renewal techniques might be appropriate.

Rejuvenation pruning involves cutting all the stems of the plant to the ground. Many deciduous shrubs respond well to this approach: new stems grow in one season from well-established roots.

Renewal pruning is more systematic and suitable for multi-stem shrubs. Cut about a third of the older stems down to the ground to open up the shrub’s structure and encourage new growth from the base.

Here are examples of seasonal pruning in my garden at this time of year.

Roses include many varieties, most of which are popular in many gardens and should be pruned in late winter or early spring to maintain an attractive shape and promote flowering. Specific advice on pruning roses is available on the American Rose Society website. Go to (www.rose.org/) and search for “pruning”.

Most gardens have spring blooming roses primarily, but a few varieties of roses should be pruned in summer rather than winter. Rambler roses, for example, should be pruned in the summer after flowering. My garden has a vigorous climbing plant, Rosa mulligani, which needs to be contained in the summer after its flowers have wilted.

Marguerite (Montanoa grandiflora). A large, upright evergreen shrub native to Mexico that produces lots of white daisy-like flowers with an attractive scent that suggests chocolate or vanilla. Each year it can be greatly reduced to stimulate new growth from the ground up.

Bolivian Fuchsia (Fuchsia boliviana ‘Alba’). It is a fast-growing evergreen shrub that can exceed twelve feet in height, growing wild in its native regions of southern Peru, Bolivia, and northern Argentina. In the garden, its size can be controlled with annual rejuvenation pruning, after which it produces abundant new growth and charming flower clusters.

Flowering Current or Gooseberry (Ribes spp.), Native to California, can grow up to 12 feet tall and wide, making it large enough for many gardens (including mine). It can be cut any time after the flowers have faded in the summer until March or even April, after which it will produce new growth and flowers the following season. My garden features white, pink and red flowering streams (R. sanguineum) and a fuchsia flowering gooseberry (R. speciosum) with interesting flowers and thorns. Everything can be cut the same way.

Lewis’s Mock Orange (Philadelphus lewisii). This deciduous shrub, native to northern California and western North America, grows up to nine feet tall, with an abundance of white flowers that smell like orange blossom. This plant does not need to be pruned, but the renewal pruning (described above) will make it a good garden companion and promote flowering.

Salvia spp. These plants are widespread members of the large sage family. According to Wikipedia, salvias grow in Central and South America (around 600 species); Central Asia and the Mediterranean (250 species); and East Asia (90 species). Among the many species of this genus, some bloom in winter, spring, summer or fall. They stand out well in rejuvenating pruning, preferably at a time related to the specific plant’s flowering cycle. For sizing recommendations, visit the excellent Flowers by the Sea website (ftbs.com) and search for “Salvias by Season” or by botanical name.

Mexican Marigold (Tagates Lemonii). This popular plant can be seen in many gardens as it grows easily in sun or partial shade and produces an abundance of golden blooms with a scent that many gardeners shy away from. After its flowers fade away in the fall (varying depending on exposure), rejuvenating pruning controls its size and results in new growth and another flowering season.

Cotoneaster spp. This is another large genus with several species within the rose family, ranging from ground covers to tall, upright shrubs. Typically, pruning should be done in late winter and designed to maintain the shrub’s naturally graceful shape. For recommendations, go to the Gardening Know How website (www.gardeningknowhow.com/) and search for “cotoneaster size”. If you know the species of your cotoneaster, search for it on the Internet, using Google.

Enrich your gardening days

A fundamental strategy for the comfort, enjoyment, and ultimate success of gardening is to advance your knowledge and skills in pruning plants. This task, linked to plant growth cycles, has seasonal priorities like those described in today’s column, and involves year-round awareness of the benefits of selective pinching, mowing, and pruning. A New Years resolution to consider would be to add a good book on pruning to your reading list.

Enjoy your garden!

Tom Karwin is the past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, and the Monterey Bay Iris Society, and UC Lifetime Master Gardener (Certified 1999- 2009). He is now a board member and garden trainer for the Santa Cruz Hostel Society. To view photos of his garden daily, https://www.facebook.com/ongardeningcom-566511763375123/. For gardening coaching information and an archive of previous gardening columns, visit http://ongardening.com. Contact him with comments or questions at tom@karwin.com.


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Complete restoration of the botanical garden could take months | News, Sports, Jobs https://rogersgardengate.com/complete-restoration-of-the-botanical-garden-could-take-months-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 16:22:12 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/complete-restoration-of-the-botanical-garden-could-take-months-news-sports-jobs/ A team is working to clear debris from the Kula Botanical Garden property after the December 5-6 storm severely damaged the Upcountry’s long-standing attraction. Photos courtesy of Kevin McCord Kula Botanical Garden owners hope to reopen part of longtime Upcountry attraction “in about a month” but estimated that sections of the gardens most severely damaged […]]]>

A team is working to clear debris from the Kula Botanical Garden property after the December 5-6 storm severely damaged the Upcountry’s long-standing attraction. Photos courtesy of Kevin McCord

Kula Botanical Garden owners hope to reopen part of longtime Upcountry attraction “in about a month” but estimated that sections of the gardens most severely damaged in the recent storm could be closed for six months to a year.

The weak Kona storm of December 5-6 that swept through the state earlier this month sent floodwaters rushing through the three ravines that cross the Kula Botanical Garden property, destroying bridges, removing a workshop and greenhouse and filling a koi pond with debris.

“The damaging part only lasted five minutes or less”, said general manager Kevin McCord, son of the founders of the garden. “By the time I got there, which was just a few minutes after it had happened, the water was flowing normally like any old storm. But it was the initial wave of mud, debris, rocks, trees and things coming down the mountain that caused all the damage.

The biggest damage occurred in the smaller ravine, McCord said. Mud crept through the walls and doors of his father’s house, swept away a new truck that McCord had only had for two weeks, and submerged a workshop and greenhouse until “there was no longer a stick.”

“It went to concrete” McCord said. “And then he took my truck and piled it on top of all the other debris. All my tools, my lawn mowers, my weed killers, everything I need to run the garden was in this shed. So it’s been a process of trying to sift through some of that slime and find some tools here and there that are survivable. “

The flood waters were so strong that they swept away a truck and put it on top of a pile of mud and debris. The storm also destroyed several bridges, ponds and the greenhouse and garden workshop.

Debris and flood water also destroyed the duck ponds and the koi pond; McCord said the ducks survived, but the roughly 40 koi carp, some between 30 and 40 years old, likely did not survive.

The garden, a popular place to shop for Christmas trees in the Upcountry, had just closed the season’s sales on the afternoon of December 5, shortly before the storm hit Maui. Most of the available trees had been cut and sold, but some that were waiting to be delivered to hotels and restaurants were damaged.

“The third ravine overflowed and went through all of our Christmas trees, so it was the least damaging of the three, but it still left a mess” McCord said. “It just scattered debris across the property.”

All in all, the botanical garden might consider damage by “The hundreds of thousands”, including about $ 100,000 to $ 150,000 for the house and $ 100,000 for the destroyed shed, McCord said. So far, most salvage efforts have focused on cleaning up all the debris, which ranges from tree trunks 2 to 3 feet in diameter and rocks. “the size of small cars.”

Once the area is cleared, reinstallation of the bridges might only take a week or two, McCord said. However, it could take a few months to rebuild the workshop and greenhouse, once a complete structure but now just a Costco tent that is used to keep the surviving tools dry.

The Botanical Garden has been a staple of the Upcountry for 50 years, a brainchild of McCord’s father, Warren, a landscape architect, and his mother Helen, a teacher. In 1968, in search of a place to exhibit Warren McCord’s work and seeing the need for more businesses and attractions in the Upcountry, the couple set out in search of land that matched his vision. They were about to visit a property when they walked past another package that immediately caught Warren McCord’s attention.

“My dad said ‘stop the car’, jumped, jumped over the fence and disappeared into the forest and came back an hour later and said, ‘I want this property’, because it had the ravines and the rock formations and all the things that made it special ”, Kevin McCord said.

The McCords approached landowner Kaonoulu Ranch and Oskie Rice, who said they were not selling, but ultimately relented and allowed the McCords to buy 13 acres. They cleared the invasive acacias, built decks and walkways, and planted a variety of plants. Eventually they approached Rice to buy more land and ended up with 22 acres, on which they opened the Kula Botanical Garden in 1971, with a wide array of plants to satisfy enthusiasts in addition to ducks, a pond of koi carp and an aviary to attract the attention of visiting school groups.

The long-standing roots of the McCord family and the Upcountry Community Botanical Garden sparked a rapid surge of support when the property was damaged. About 20 to 30 people showed up for workdays on December 11-12, helping to pick up mud and debris, and Kevin McCord is hoping to organize another workday on January 8.

“The community has been great especially some of our close friends have been there” he said. “They were there every day for two weeks with their friends, and the community presence and help was fantastic.”

At a time when the family should relax and enjoy the post Christmas tree rush, the work ahead is daunting, “But we must also count our blessings” he said.

” No one was hurt. There were people in the house at the time, and any of us could have stood in front of that wall of mud and debris, ” he stressed.

“All physical things can be replaced. It’s sad to see them destroyed, but it would be sadder to have lost or hurt someone.

* Colleen Uechi can be contacted at cuechi@mauinews.com.

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The pandemic has brought big changes to gardening and “gardening” https://rogersgardengate.com/the-pandemic-has-brought-big-changes-to-gardening-and-gardening/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 19:17:54 +0000 https://rogersgardengate.com/the-pandemic-has-brought-big-changes-to-gardening-and-gardening/ Ornamental grasses, already all the rage before COVID, have become in high demand. (Getty Images) “Gardening During the Pandemic” could be the title of a book one day, an in-depth study of how COVID-19 has affected home gardening. You won’t see me writing it, however. First of all, the impact seems to be huge – […]]]>

“Gardening During the Pandemic” could be the title of a book one day, an in-depth study of how COVID-19 has affected home gardening. You won’t see me writing it, however.

First of all, the impact seems to be huge – too great for me to do a full research, nonetheless broach for a book. Then there is the question of whether and when this damn virus will finally be contained. With omicron just taking hold, the changes to gardening practices in 2020-21 will harden and spread.

You would have to be totally disconnected from everything not to already know the impact of COVID on the collection of houseplants. Internet media can’t seem to write too often about the new reality of life – Google “new houseplants” or “rare houseplants”. People have gone crazy, and if Amazon and other internet sources are correct, they are still going crazy for houseplants. There has been an explosion of interest not only in readily available – dare I say common – houseplants, but an expansion into rare and expensive plants. Polls show the trend is here to stay.

The next trend is to grow food indoors. More and more people, millennials in particular, want to grow food at home, so there has been a proliferation of websites, blogs, and media outlets to help people pursue that goal. It is not only the interest in the cultivation systems in the kitchen. People grow all kinds of things inside. In fact, I can feel a column going up!

Another gardening trend that has become widespread is the use of social media to reach and teach gardeners, especially newbies who are mostly millennials and those who live much of their lives online. Newspaper columns and even blogs turn into YouTube and Reddits channels. Ouch! I’ll be aged by a TikTok-er!

In addition, the use of video has increased exponentially. I remember when we first started including website references in the 90s. There was no going back. Newer phones make it easy to create videos and there are plenty of sites that host them.

Some 18 million new gardeners have entered the scene, and more will come. As you might expect, they are making changes. It sounds odd, but things like Wi-Fi are becoming a thing to have in your backyard. Maybe a router in your outdoor greenhouse this year?

Oh, I laughed when I saw my first outdoor lounge a few years ago. There was a huge TV! “Gardening” now includes the landscaped area with a fire pit, laptops being a COVID trend, a gas grill, and plenty of comfortable seating. To my amazement, more and more giant screen televisions are installed in these areas! (Check out that weatherproof TV.) It’s set in the Lower 48’s suburbs, but could it happen in Alaska?

Shared gardening has also become a thing during COVID, and people love it enough that it becomes a permanent thing and not just a trend. Neighbors and “pod members” share the work and the harvest. A site that shows how to start a shared garden (as well as the new trend in video use) is here.

I’m not sure we see it here in Alaska, but a lot of the focus on gardening has shifted from backyard gardening to porch view gardening. This is where people spent an inordinate amount of pandemic time, and in some places, this is how neighbors communicated. There is tons of “what to grow on a porch” like this. These are great, especially if you have exposure to the south of the porch.

Ornamental grasses, already in fashion before COVID, have become very desirable and have now established themselves outdoors. They may be part of the ‘rid the yard of lawns’ movement, but what was previously billed as a parking shield and low-maintenance plants for hard-to-reach areas – clumps of plants of 4, 5 and 6 feet, rippling in the breeze – kind of caught in home gardens and landscapes. The industry has noticed and produced more. I hope our local outlets will sell as much as can be found in outdoor nurseries. You can find examples here.

And finally, organic gardening – the use of capital letters is intentional – has cemented its place as the only way to garden during the pandemic. Millennials must have learned some science in school and are skeptical of gardening companies that are literally the only ones promoting non-organic produce. Proof of the trend, more and more nurseries only offer organic products. Advice to local nurseries: Business has never been better.

I don’t know what will follow, or what trend will become a permanent fixture in gardening. However, things are changing and will change a lot more before the pandemic is over. Thanks to the Internet – now a permanent gardening tool and not just a trend – we won’t have to wonder what it is.

Jeff’s Garden Calendar

Happy gardening everyone: Thank you for the gift of being able to write this column every week. I couldn’t do it without your support.

Seattle Flower and Garden Show: February 9-13 at the Washington State Convention Center. https://gardenshow.com/information.

Last minute, the best gardening gift: Alaska Botanical Garden membership, www.alaskabg.org. It is a gift that every gardener and family needs and should have. Buy a subscription for yourself if no one else does.


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