VanDusen Botanical Garden Visitor Center / Perkins & Will

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VanDusen Botanical Garden Visitor Center / Perkins & Will

© Nic Lehoux© Nic Lehoux© Nic Lehoux© Nic Lehoux+ 31


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    19483 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2011


  • Photographs Photographs: Nicolas lehoux

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Structure Crafts, Bentley, Retro plate, Selux, Soprema, BASF Walltite Eco, Bohle glues, Columbia Glazing, Ocean concrete, Pacific woodworking, Whitewater shotcrete, Zinco, go down, clearbrook steel, douglas lighting controls, eco-fluid, sunda solar tubes

  • Principal architect:

    Pierre Busby









© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Text description provided by the architects. When the number of visitors to the VanDusen Botanical Garden began to decline in the early 2000s, the Vancouver Botanical Gardens Association and the Vancouver Parks Board set out to find a way to revitalize interest in VanDusen as a destination. . They realized that a new facility was needed, one that could attract visitors locally while raising the profile of the garden internationally.

© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux
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© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Our design places the new visitor center at the entrance to the garden, offering a glimpse of the beautiful spaces inside and transforming it into a walkway that entices visitors and passers-by to explore the grounds beyond. Guided by the mandate and spirit of conservation of the Garden, our design delicately balances architecture and landscape, integrating natural and human systems in a meaningful way to support biodiversity and ecological balance within the site. LEED Platinum and Living Building Challenge Petal certified, its distinct organic roof shape and broad green building strategies make the Visitor Center more than a landmark in the city of Vancouver, but an international icon of sustainability.

© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Organic structure. Inspired by the organic forms and natural systems of a native orchid, the project is organized into undulating green roof “petals” that float above adobe walls. This concept has extended beyond form, helping us respond to many challenges that have arisen. Throughout the design process, we often asked ourselves, “How would a flower (orchid) do?” A flower takes root in its place by harvesting all of its own energy and water, adapting to the climate. and at the site, operating pollution-free, and promoting health and well-being.

© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Balance architecture and landscape. The visitor center uses on-site renewable sources (geothermal boreholes, photovoltaic solar panels, solar hot water tubes) to target net zero energy on an annual basis. Rainwater is filtered and used for the building’s gray water needs; 100% of the black water is treated by an on-site bioreactor and released into a new percolation field and a garden.

© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

Build the complex geometry of a curved roof. Various 3D modeling programs were used to create the basic geometry of the roof, using parametric techniques to optimize curvature and layout. This model was then used by structural engineers to arrive at the structural design and passed on to manufacturers to determine the most efficient way to panelize each segment. The final structure uses an assembly of glulam (or “glulam”) columns and beams to support the intricate curves at the edges of each panel.

© Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux



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